Culture and Lovers Rock Reggae Songs (2010 – 2015)

Maxi Priest brings reggae to the fans at Stage 48 in Manhattan, on March 31, 2013. Photography by Clyde Belcon

Maxi Priest brings reggae to the fans at Stage 48 in Manhattan, on March 31, 2013.
Photography by Clyde Belcon

This episode starts in 2015 with a couple new entries from Queen Ifrica and Archangel Superpec, but the overall selections focus on one-drop remixes, pop music covers, lovers rock, and roots reggae singles mostly from 2012 through 2014. The mix is filled with the sounds of today’s hottest producers and artists like ChronixxJah9, Damian Marley, Tarrus Riley, Jah Cure and more.

DOWNLOAD

Playlist:

1 Queen Ifrica – Let Me Get To Know You
2 Archangel Superpec – There She Is
3 Maxi Priest featuring Stylo G – Easy To Love (Remix)
4 Beres Hammond – In My Arms
5 Them Island Boyz featuring Jah Cure – Kiss Me Girl
6 Romain Virgo – This Love
7 Sanchez – Now and Forever
8 Tarrus Riley – Young Heart
9 Gyptian – Love You Forever
10 Jah Cure – Love You Anyway
11 Rihanna ft. David Guetta – Right Now (J-Vibe Reggae Remix)
12 Chronixx – Alpha and Omega
13 Mavado – Soldiers (R.I.P Roach)
14 Usher – Climax (Walshy Fire / Jus Bus Reggae Remix)
15 Gappy Ranks – Carpenter
16 Jah9 – Steamers A Bubble
17 Tarrus Riley – For Me
18 Sean Paul featuring Damian Marley – Riot
19 Daville – Mirror
20 Tessanne Chin – If You Love Me
21 Shaggy featuring Beres Hammond – Fight This Feeling
22 Roots Queen – Fly With Me
23 Protoje – KIngston Be Wise
24 Busy Signal featuring Damian Marley – Kingston Town (Remix)
25 Jah Bouks – Angola
26 Amy Winehouse featuring Alborosie – Sweet Guitar (Remix)
27 Lutan Fyah – Diamond At Home
28 Tarrus Riley – Cold Girl

 

Reggae Singer Luciano, Greatest Hits Highlighted

luci

We salute a living legend, reggae singer Luciano who has released 21 studio albums over the course of a brilliant 22 year career. One of my favorite artists and live performers, Luciano gained prominence around the world during the “Rastafari renaissance” in dancehall that took place in the mid-late 1990s. He established himself as a name synonymous with roots reggae and became one the sub-genre’s pillars.

Direct download: 41_-_Reggae_Lover_Podcast.mp3 (Right-click and select “Save link as…“)

This 1 hour mix of 42 songs focuses heavily on Luciano’s material from Where There Is Life, and Messenger, which were albums produced by Phillip “Fattis” Burrell and his Xterminator label. His latest album,The Qabalah Man, was released on the 29th of November 2013. Please support this phenomenally talented artist by buying his music/merchandise and patronizing his live concerts. You will not be disappointed.

Luciano Playlist

After All (album)

After All (album) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

1 Intro
2 Guess Whats Happening
3 Never Give Up My Pride
4 Final Call
5 Jah Is My Navigator
6 Sweet Jamaica
7 Business Lock
8 Jah Lives
9 If There Was No God
10 Good God
11 Skank If You Skanking
12 Sweep Over My Soul
13 Should I Slumber
14 Come Away
15 Level Up The Unity
16 Glory Be
17 Wicked Haffi Run Away
18 Where There is Life
19 Shake It Up Tonight
20 In This Together
21 Messenger
22 Peace My Brethren Peace
23 Punchline 24 Jah Kingdom featuring Capleton
25 Give Praise/Jah Blessing (dub plate)
26 Who Could It Be
27 Love Jah and Live
28 Ulterior Motive
29 One Way Ticket
30 Oh Father I Love You
31 What We Gonna Do featuring Buju Banton
32 We Be Alright featuring Buju Banton
33 Heaven Help Up All
34 How Can You?
35 Thank You Lord (dub plate)
36 He Is My Friend
37 As the Beat Goes On
38 Win or Lose
39 Your World and Mine
40 Lord Give Me Strength
41 Jah Jah Never Let Me Down
42 Write My Name

The Reggae Defenders

reggaelover40

DOWNLOAD

This Reggae Lover Podcast episode opens with the leader of the reggae revival Protoje explaining that he makes music from his heart and not for the charts. Sizzla can be heard begging “Please do not mash up the dance.” George Nooks and Mikey Spice tell stories about having a good time in the dancehall. Alborosie excerpts that Reggae and rubadub music still rock the dancehall to this day.

Garnett Silk compares music to the rod that Moses walked with as he led the Father’s people to the promised land. Luciano sings about the many positive effects of reggae music on the body and mind. Richie Stephens and U-Roy sing out about the nicest times when real reggae music used to play.

Bryan Art describes the love and confidence that overcomes one when entering the dancehall. Christopher Martin paints the picture of a reggae road block where people are dancing in the streets, creating the perfect chill spot. Crooner Kashief Lindo shares a bit of his personal story on the song “Music Is A Part Of Me.”

Steel Pulse, Dubtonic Kru, Gramps Morgan, XO, Hero and Richie Spice all give their take on why Reggae music is so good and what it means to them. Busy Signal goes in about how everybody smiles and unites when positive reggae music is played.

Gentleman teams with Sugar Minott to reminisce about the good old days when there was no drama and the musical foundation imparted love and good vibes. Inner Circle alongside The Reggae Wave sing in defense of the genre.

Do you want this full track list or to make requests?  What kind of reggae do you want in the mix on an upcoming episode?

The Dominance of King Jammy and Biltmore Era Riddims

Reggae Lover Podcast 39The episode commences with the Sly and Robbie produced version of the Randy Newman song, "Baltimore" from 1979 sung by The Tamlins. Courtney Melody and Dennis Brown follow with big tunes on the Baltimore Riddim before the hit from mighty King Jammys catalog, Dennis Brown's "The Exit.”   Wayne Fire’s “Sexy Body” (1991) and “Come Down” by Super Cat from 1988 on the Wild Apache label launch the mix into the late 1980s. Listen for a Kenneth Hoo Kim produced version of the Hypocrite riddim released in 1984, and then almost every song after that point involves producers Bobby Digital, Steely and Clevie, and/or King Jammys.   The highlight is the Duck aka Duck Dance riddim from 1988. This was a time when Jammy’s label usually had 10 out of the top 20 songs on Jamaica’s charts and Admiral Bailey was the dominant artist in dancehall and on stage shows.   Tracklist  1 The Tamlins - Baltimore 2 Courtney Melody - In The Streets 3 Dennis Brown - The More I Excel 4 Dennis Brown - The Exit 5 Wayne Fire - Sexy Body 6 Super Cat - Come Down 7 Wayne Smith - Karma Chameleon 8 Tony Tuff - Gone Clear 9 Don Angelo - Settlement 10 Earl Sixteen - Come A Long Way 11 Midnight Rider - Hypocrite 12 Pad Anthony - Rub A Dub A Play 13 Johnny Osbourne - Gentle Is The Sound 14 Derrick Parker - My Heart Is Gone 15 Singing Melody - Hurry Back Home 16 Shabba Ranks - Gal Yuh Good 17 Shabba Ranks - Pay Down Pon It 18 Little Twitch - Watch Your Friends Them 19 Anthony Malvo - Run For Your Life 20 Josey Wales - Stamp Out 21 Tiger - The Dam Thing 22 Ninja Man - More Reality 23 Admiral Bailey - Them Have Fe Wait 24 Papa San - Style and Fashion 25 Chaka Demus - Bad Bad Shaka 26 Flourgon - Bounce 27 Red Dragon - Duck Dance 28 Singing Melody and Johnny P - Say You Love Me Baby 29 Bunny General - Must Get Defeat 30 Johnny P - Sound A Sound 31 Cocoa Tea and Charlie Chaplin - Lets Give Thanks 32 John Mouse - Me A Me 33 Chevell Franklyn - No One In The World 34 Lady Venus - Best Friend A Gi You Bun 35 Clement Irie - Loving 36 Johnny P - Cut Up 37 Lady Patra - Gun Inna Panty 38 Ninja Man - Heartical Don

Reggae Lover Podcast 39B

DOWNLOAD #REGGAELOVER PODCAST 39B

The episode commences with the Sly and Robbie produced version of the Randy Newman song, “Baltimore” from 1979 sung by The Tamlins. Courtney Melody and Dennis Brown follow with big tunes on the Baltimore Riddim before the hit from mighty King Jammys catalog, Dennis Brown’s “The Exit.”

Wayne Fire’s “Sexy Body” (1991) and “Come Down” by Super Cat from 1988 on the Wild Apache label launch the mix into the late 1980s. Listen for a Kenneth Hoo Kim produced version of the Hypocrite riddim released in 1984, and then almost every song after that point involves producers Bobby Digital, Steely and Clevie, and/or King Jammys.

The highlight is the Duck aka Duck Dance riddim from 1988. This was a time when Jammy’s label usually had 10 out of the top 20 songs on Jamaica’s charts and Admiral Bailey was the dominant artist in dancehall and on stage shows.

Tracklist

1 The Tamlins – Baltimore
2 Courtney Melody – In The Streets
3 Dennis Brown – The More I Excel
4 Dennis Brown – The Exit
5 Wayne Fire – Sexy Body
6 Super Cat – Come Down
7 Wayne Smith – Karma Chameleon
8 Tony Tuff – Gone Clear
9 Don Angelo – Settlement
10 Earl Sixteen – Come A Long Way
11 Midnight Rider – Hypocrite
12 Pad Anthony – Rub A Dub A Play
13 Johnny Osbourne – Gentle Is The Sound
14 Derrick Parker – My Heart Is Gone
15 Singing Melody – Hurry Back Home
16 Shabba Ranks – Gal Yuh Good
17 Shabba Ranks – Pay Down Pon It
18 Little Twitch – Watch Your Friends Them
19 Anthony Malvo – Run For Your Life
20 Josey Wales – Stamp Out
21 Tiger – The Dam Thing
22 Ninja Man – More Reality
23 Admiral Bailey – Them Have Fe Wait
24 Papa San – Style and Fashion
25 Chaka Demus – Bad Bad Shaka
26 Flourgon – Bounce
27 Red Dragon – Duck Dance
28 Singing Melody and Johnny P – Say You Love Me Baby
29 Bunny General – Must Get Defeat
30 Johnny P – Sound A Sound
31 Cocoa Tea and Charlie Chaplin – Lets Give Thanks
32 John Mouse – Me A Me
33 Chevell Franklyn – No One In The World
34 Lady Venus – Best Friend A Gi You Bun
35 Clement Irie – Loving
36 Johnny P – Cut Up
37 Lady Patra – Gun Inna Panty
38 Ninja Man – Heartical Don

Bob Marley 70th Birthday Bash Promo Mixtape *Side A*

1
Bob Marley Birthday 2015 Promotional Mix by Highlanda and Archangel

Bob Marley Birthday 2015 Promotional Mix by Highlanda and Archangel

Please enjoy this mixtape, a collaboration between Superpec and Kahlil Wonda comprised of music from Bob Marley, Stephen Marley, Damian Marley, and Kymani Marley along with Sizzla, Capleton, Tessanne Chin, Trey Songz, Bobby Brown, Spragga Benz, and Queen Ifrica.

Also listen out for foundation reggae giants like Bunny Wailer, Peter Tosh, Dennis Brown, Toots, Third World, Freddie McGregor, Horace Andy, Ed Robinson, Gregory Isaacs, Willie Williams, Ini Kamozi, Papa Michigan, Johnny Osborne, Half Pint, Garnett Silk, and Steele Pulse.

DOWNLOAD

Right-click the link above and select “Save link as…,” download from Soundcloud or steam with Mixcloud.

BOB MARLEY 70th BIRTHDAY BASH PROMO MIXTAPE - SIDE A by Highlanda Sound on Mixcloud

The Barrington Levy Lovers Rock Experience

1
A request from a die-hard fan and a follow-up to my Roots, Reality, and Culture 100% Barrington Levy mix (Reggae Lover Podcast #35), this episode presents the best of love songs from Mr. Levy’s extensive catalog.   Take a listen to experience the raw dancehall reggae vibe that ruled from the late 1970’s all the way through the 1980s. Barrington’s vocal delivery is like none other, and some of my personal favorite songs are included here such as "Shine Eye Girl" and "Moonlight Lover" from 1979’s classic 'Bounty Hunter' album released on the Jah Life label and recorded at Channel One studios.   Barrington Levy Playlist  1 Like How You Kiss And Caress Me 2 Super Star Girl 3 Mary Long Tongue 4 Shine Eye Gal 5 Sister Carol 6 If You Give To Me 7 Jumpy Girl 8 Dances Are Changing 9 Why Did You Leave Me 10 Wife and Sweet Heart Dem A Friend 11 Shine Eye Girl (alt. version) 12 True Love 13 Shaolin Temple (Pretty Looks) 14 Lonely Man 15 Trying To Rule My Life 16 My Woman 17 21 Girls Salute 18 Moonlight Lover 19 I'm Not In Love 20 Good Loving 21 Mini Bus 22 Love Someone 23 Pick Your Choice 24 She's Mine 25 Here I Come 26 Too Experienced  Direct download: 38_-_Reggae_Lover_Podcast.mp3

Episode 38 – Barrington Levy Greatest Lovers Rock Anthems

A request from a die-hard fan and a follow-up to my Roots, Reality, and Culture 100% Barrington Levy mix (Reggae Lover Podcast #35), this episode presents the best of love songs from Mr. Levy’s extensive catalog.Take a listen to experience the raw dancehall reggae vibe that ruled from the late 1970’s all the way through the 1980s. Barrington’s vocal delivery is like none other, and some of my personal favorite songs are included here such as “Shine Eye Girl” and “Moonlight Lover” from 1979’s classic ‘Bounty Hunter‘ album released on the Jah Life label and recorded at Channel One studios.Barrington Levy Playlist

1 Like How You Kiss And Caress Me
2 Super Star Girl
3 Mary Long Tongue
4 Shine Eye Gal
5 Sister Carol
6 If You Give To Me
7 Jumpy Girl
8 Dances Are Changing
9 Why Did You Leave Me
10 Wife and Sweet Heart Dem A Friend
11 Shine Eye Girl (alt. version)
12 True Love
13 Shaolin Temple (Pretty Looks)
14 Lonely Man
15 Trying To Rule My Life
16 My Woman
17 21 Girls Salute
18 Moonlight Lover
19 I’m Not In Love
20 Good Loving
21 Mini Bus
22 Love Someone
23 Pick Your Choice
24 She’s Mine
25 Here I Come
26 Too Experienced

Direct download: 38_-_Reggae_Lover_Podcast.mp3

2 Bad Riddims: The Stalag versus The Sleng Teng

5

stalag-sleng_teng

It’s brings me great pleasure to release this episode of the Reggae Lover Podcast which features two riddims that were suggested by my listeners: the Stalag version and the Sleng Teng rhythm. If you have ever been to a reggae dance or concert, you have definitely heard songs on one or both of these legendary riddim tracks which have had a dominating prominence in the dancehall for three decades.

I selected this 22 song playlist out of the hundreds of tunes that have been recorded over these versions. The mix is comprised mostly of the original cuts produced by Winston “Techniques” Riley and Lloyd ‘King Jammy’ James. Please submit playlist suggestions and feedback to ReggaeLoverPodcast@gmail.com.

In Jamaica, the Stalag version (or Stalag riddim) is a popular reggae rhythm, which came to prominence in the 1970s. It was originally written and performed as “Stalag 17″ (named after the 1953 war film) by Ansell Collins, and released by Winston Riley‘s Techniques record label in 1973.

It was mainly used for dub instrumental versions, often b-sides of records. The rhythm also influenced early hip-hop, and can be discerned on Public Enemy’s hit ‘Don’t Believe the Hype’ as well as on Too Short’s Blowjob Betty.

Sleng Teng is the name given to the first fully computerized riddim in Jamaican music. The riddim, which was created by the collaboration between King Jammy and Wayne Smith, was titled “Under Mi Sleng Teng“. Wayne Smith found the computerized sound in Noel Davey’s keyboard, and together he and Davey arranged the riddim, slowed it down, matched it to Smith’s key, and rehearsed on it with lyrics inspired by Barrington Levy’s “Under Mi Sensi” and Yellowman’s “Under me fat ting”, before taking it to Jammy’s studio in late 1984. The riddim itself is apparently an attempt to recreate Eddie Cochran’s 1959 rockabilly song “Somethin’ Else.” It is a pattern found in the Casio MT-40 home keyboard.

After the riddim was brought to the studio and Jammy heard it, he then slowed it further and placed piano and a clap on it. Jammy recorded a number of other artists on the original backing track including Tenor Saw (with “Pumpkin Belly”), and Johnny Osbourne (with “Buddy Bye”). The tunes were first unleashed at a now legendary soundclash between Jammy’s own sound system and Black Scorpio at Waltham Park Road on February 23, 1985.

 

Stalag 17 Playlist

1 Frankie Paul – Don’t Worry Yourself – Volcano
2 General Echo – Arlene – Techniques
3 Admiral Tibett – Trouble To A Man – Techniques
4 Little Kirk – Whats Love Got To Do – Techniques
5 Yami Bolo – Take It Easy – Techniques
6 Cocoa Tea – We Do The Killing – Digital B
7 Super Beagle – Soundboy Dust Out – Techniques
8 Tenor Saw and Buju Banton – Ring The Alarm Quick – Techniques
9 Sister Nancy – Bam Bam – Techniques
10 Cutty Ranks – Rude Bwoy Game – Techniques
11 Nicodemus – Suzy Wong – Skengdon

Sleng Teng Playlist

1 Wayne Smith – Under Me Sleng Teng – Jammys
2 Tenor Saw – Pumpkin Belly – Jammys
3 Echo Minott – Original Fat Ting – Jammys
4 Buddy Bye – Johnny Osbourne – Jammys
5 Josey Wales – Cowboy Style – Jammys
6 Yelloman – Reggae Ambassador – Jammys
7 Tony Curtis – Weak – John John
8 Anthony Red Rose – Under Me Fat Ting – King Tubbys
9 John Wayne – Call The Police For Me – Jammys
10 Super Cat – Trash and Ready – Jammys
11 Frankie Paul – Cassandra – Steely and Clevie

Direct download: 36_-_Reggae_Lover_Podcast.mp3 (Right-click and select “Save link as…”)

Crucial Selections from The ‘A Love I Can Feel’ Rhythm

2

AloveIcanfeelThis is another listener suggested mix specially prepared for the reggae lover podcast.

The ‘A Love I Can Feel‘ rhythm was first released on a vocal by John Holt under the same name in 1970. It was produced by Coxsone Dodd at Studio One and was a sizeable hit. John Holt re-recorded his original vocal a number of times (about once per decade) including for Henry ‘Junjo’ Lawes’ Volcano label, King Jammy, and the Parish label. The rhythm has been used around 100 times, most frequently by King Jammy and Donovon Germain of Penthouse Records.

Please download using the link below, and feel free to spread the word to fellow reggae lovers. Also email reggaeloverpodcast@gmail.com to make suggestions, requests or comments, and to get additional information.

Playlist:

1 John Holt – A Love I Can Feel – Studio One
2 Dennis Alcapone – A Love I Can Feel – Studio One
3 Freddie McGregor – When I’m Ready – Studio One
4 George Scott – Love You Still – Studio One
5 Cornell Campbell – Give Your Love To Me – Gorgon
6 Prince Jazzbo – Straight To I-Roy Head – Lagoon
7 Shinehead – Golden Touch – African Love
8 Josey Wales – Weh Dem A Go Do “86″ – Tuff Gong
9 Nana McClean – Nana’s Medley – Penthouse
10 Sanchez – Wont Last A Day – Germain
11 Tony Tuff – I’ve Got To Get You – Penthouse
12 Richie Stephens – Trying To Get To You – Penthouse
13 Tony Rebel – Fresh Vegetable – Penthouse
14 Pinchers – Stand By Me Pt. 2 – Penthouse
15 Sanchez – I Can’t Wait – Digital B
16 Beres Hammond – Tempted To Touch
17 Beres Hammond and Cutty Ranks – Love Me Haffi Get
18 Pinchers – Dreams and Illusions – Jammys
19 Frankie Paul – Benefit of the Doubt – Black Scorpio

Direct download: 37_-_Reggae_Lover_Podcast.mp3 (Right-click and select “Save link as…”)

"Episode 36 - Barrington Levy Roots, Reality, and Culture"

Barrington Levy Roots, Reality, and Culture – Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 36

5

Barrington Levy is one of the only reggae singers to have great success throughout the entire decade of the the 1980s. He recorded prolifically with many of his releases topping charts in Jamaica and the UK while he maintained his relevance in the dancehall from then until now.

Barrington Levy

A Reggae Lover Podcast listener suggested that I feature Barrington’s work, so I have selected this portion of tunes which highlights some of my favorite reality tunes and features many of the Joe Gibbs and Volcano roots recordings. A follow-up mix that covers lovers rock will be coming soon.

Download here. (Right-click and select “Save link as…”

Barrington Levy Playlist:

1 Now A Days
2 Don’t Fuss or Fight
3 Do Good
4 Murderer
5 Too Poor
6 Praise His Name
7 Sensimelea
8 Under Me Sensi
9 Collie Weed
10 Dont Pretend
11 Mine Your Mouth
12 This Little Boy
13 Jah Is With Me
14 Prison Oval Rock
15 Money Move
16 Teach The Youths
17 Black Roses
18 My Time

1990s Roots Reggae featuring Garnet Silk, Luciano, Anthony B and more

2

rl-34_lalabella

Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 34 opens with Queen Ifrica, Anthony B, and Bushman singing about police brutality from a Jamaican perspective.

Riddims featured include Tempo, Shank I Sheck, Rockfort Rock, Promised Land, and Darker Shade of Black plus 1996’s masterpiece from Flames Productions, the Lalabella among others, while the subject-matter is conscious, spiritual and cultural.

The finale is “Splashing Dashing” (the 23rd Psalm) being performed by Garnett Silk on the Champion of the Arena riddim, released on the Fattis Burrell’s Exterminator record label. Rest In Peace to Garnett Silk who flew away home to Zion almost exactly 20 years ago.

DOWNLOAD

Playlist:
1 Queen Ifrica – Babylon Blunder
2 Anthony B – Good Cop
3 Anthony B – Police
4 Anthony B – Fire Bun Now
5 Bushman – Robbery
6 Aaron Silk – The Right Path
7 Uton Green – No Looking Back
8 Lebanculah and Sugar Black – Oh Jah
9 Everton Blender – Ghetto People Song
10 Tony Rebel – Why Be Afraid
11 Bounty Killer and Junior Reid – This World Too Haunted
12 Glen Washington – Why
13 Garnett Silk and Capleton – Complaint
14 Luciano – One Way Ticket
15 Luciano – Raggamuffin
16 Everton Blender – Blow Your Nose
17 Beres Hammond – Freedom
18 Garnett Silk – Splashing Dashing