DJ Kash on Reggae Lover

DJ Kash Credits Jamaican Sound System Culture with Shaping his Sound

Special guest DJ Kash shares his perspective as a DJ/producer who has worked with various artists in the diaspora. 

DJ Kash just released a new single called All Night Long featuring Tifa and is working on his debut EP. We get his take on the industry, artists, culture, and how his contributions propel the music.

During this conversation we uncovered:

  • How did the song with Tifa, “All Night Long,” come about?
  • How was DJ Kash able to champion Caribbean music on ATL commercial radio?
  • How did Kash get popular on the ATL club scene and start touring?
  • How does the Jamaican sound system culture influence his style of DJing and MCing?
  • How did he get into music production?

“The best DJs in the world are Caribbean DJs …because we are the king of genres.”

DJ Kash
DJ Kash ATL on the Reggae Lover Podcast 2020.

Buzzworthy, Tastemaker, and Sound Clash Update

[Documentary] Chasing the Sound: Major Lazer – Travel with Major Lazer to Ghana and Nigeria to make the world smaller by making the party bigger.

[Single] All Night Long by DJ Kash and Tifa.

[Soundclash News] The No Jing Bang clash tournament Grand Final was Saturday, October 10th. Sponsored by the world’s #1 DJ software platform Serato, the final featured Tek 9 from Brooklyn versus Kanabis from Antigua.

[Podcast Interview] Sean Paul responds to criticisms for labeling dancehall clash culture as “slavery mentality.” – Watch Now via The Fix

[Sound Clash Audio] Eagle Force vs Love People vs Super Gold vs Inferno 10/20 (45 Shop Lock) JA ( Finals) – Listen

The Journey Chosen

The Journey Chosen review

A review of The Journey Chosen by Spragga Benz, the new album. Nick from the Jamaican State of Mind podcast links up to defend Spragga, his favorite artist.

The Journey Chosen by Spragga Benz

Buzzworthy

  • Koffee becomes Mastercard’s brand ambassador for Jamaica.
  • Buju Banton featured on FIFA 21, performs for launch.
  • SoundChat Radio launches a new website with a premium subscription model.

The Tastemaker

  • Koffee and Buju team up for the “Pressure” remix.
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Shenseea and Tarrus Riley

Vanity Metrics in Reggae

We discuss the reggae industry’s focus on vanity metrics such as social media likes and YouTube views versus actionable metrics such as engagement and sales.

Reggae/dancehall fans find ways to get new music for free (YouTube, mixtapes, sound system audio, email blasts, SoundCloud, etc). The reggae media primarily reports on vanity metrics. Fans form opinions based on the opinions of others if they have to. They also find reasons to justify why they did not buy the new album(s).

Conversely, fans of other genres are known for taking action by collecting (buying) albums, whether digital or hard copy. They collect the new albums of the artists they like and then form their own opinions about the music. We break down the reasons for this disparity.

Are Vanity Metrics Running Dancehall Reggae?

Buzzworthy

  • Kahlil Wonda reviews Tarrus Riley’s new album, “Healing.”
  • Reactions to the passing of celebrated Reggae icon and trailblazer, Toots Hibbert.

The Tastemaker

Babylon Warfare by Tarrus Riley ft. Teejay and Dean Fraser.

Maxi Priest and Jonathan Emile interview

Maxi Priest and Johnathan Emile Interview

We talk to Maxi Priest and Jonathan Emile who collaborated on Emile’s recently released “Babylon is Falling” Remix.

Maxi Priest

Reggae music has always been at the forefront of social and political issues. One example is Bob Marley’s participation in the Amandla Festival of 1979 in Boston. There, Marley performed in support of the anti-apartheid movement and the liberation of South Africa.  

A few short months ago, the entire world was shaken when George Floyd lost his life.  People protested, buildings and businesses burned – all while in the middle of a worldwide pandemic.  Race relations were already strained, but this event managed to trigger both a national and international outcry for change and justice.

“Babylon is Falling” is a song that has put a voice to the change.  The song features 2 artists (Jonathan Emile and Maxi Priest) from different generations coming together to speak on what they’ve been through, and what’s to come.

Maxi Priest and Jonathan Emile reggae lover podcast cover.

We held reasoning on the following with Maxi Priest and Jonathan Emile:

  • How did the Remix to “Babylon is Falling” featuring Maxi Priest come about?
  • Different flavors of racism in the UK, Canada, and the Southern U.S.
  • The concept behind “Spaces In Between,” Jonathan’s debut reggae album. 
  • Maxi Priest’s excitement for his forthcoming album, “United State of Mind.”
  • Why are some Caribbean people afraid to go back to the region?
  • Billboard’s disrespect towards dancehall culture with their Verzuz cover.
  • What is the responsibility of musicians in fighting oppression?
  • The problem with trying to control musicians’ creative output.

‘Babylon is Falling’ Remix – Jonathan Emile ft Maxi Priest

Two Artists from Different Generations Come Together to Sing About the State of the World Today: 

Canadian-Jamaican artist Jonathan Emile and British-Jamaican artist Maxi Priest came together to create the Remix to “Babylon is Falling”, a track on Emile’s new album, “Spaces In Between.” The album is currently distributed by MindPeaceLove/Tuff Gong International.  While the remix to the song was recorded back in January 2020, neither artist knew at the time that the song would become so relevant a few months later.

Emile is a bilingual (English & French), multi-talented singer-songwriter, producer, and Cancer survivor.  His commanding voice resonates at the start of the song and draws the listener in immediately, asking if they know what their worth is, and then mentions the capitalistic society in which we live.  He then explains that this can’t go on and eventually, something has to change (Babylon will fall). 

“Growing up Black and Jamaican in Montreal, racism has been a fact of life. The institutional side was hidden but the interpersonal is still always present. As a Black person, you know you need to move cautiously to gain access, be accommodated, or have the opportunity to be treated with respect. This caution manifests in how you speak, how you read a room, and how you respond to racist banter or microaggressions.

Knowing that you’re seen as the other, alien, or ‘less than’ is at the forefront as you face people’s prejudice, always having to be an ambassador for your race. You become a master negotiator, code switcher, and an expert in de-escalation to preserve your body and reputation. This is a key concept in Spaces-In-Between.  I am fortunate to have parents who provided me with tactics and strategies to avoid and cope with racism as a young Black Jamaican. The knowledge I received was built on their hard work and determination.”

Jonathan Emile

Grammy-nominated Maxi Priest, best known for his Lover’s Rock and R&B/Reggae fusion tunes like “Close to You’ and “Wild World” comes in next, but he’s not singing about love this time.  In fact, he’s Deejaying (rapping), which in itself is a rare sound for him.  He rides the riddim with the smoothness that he’s best known for, but the content of the lyrics speak of the things he’s both experienced himself throughout the years growing up in England, and what he continues to see around him today.  His message, like so many, is that he’s tired. 

Here we go again – We stand firm we nah ease up the pressure – Just like a volcano bubbling over – to take it to the heights you have fi step like a soldier”

Maxi Priest

Although both Emile and Priest come from different generations, they have many things in common, including being of Jamaican heritage, and growing up and living outside of Jamaica, which has impacted them.  

Like so many people that live abroad, there are mixed feelings right now with what is happening with the racial, economic, and spiritual climate, and the uneasiness that it brings.  “Babylon is Falling” is a song that resonates with everyone, no matter where you come from, or what age you are.  

The Caribbean-American experience with Brian Cox of The Vault: Classic Music Reviews Podcast

The Vault: Classic Music Reviews podcast host, Brian Cox gave us an education on the island of Grenada. 

Brian shared his unique perspective as a first-generation American of Caribbean descent. He described the soundtrack of Grenada, and how music has changed there over time. We learned about the music and food you would encounter at a typical Grenadian party.  

The Vault Classic Music Reviews podcast host, Brian Cox quoted on Reggae Lover podcast.

The Vault: Classic Music Reviews is a top-rated music commentary podcast. The co-hosts, hip-hop fans that grew up in the 90s, review classic hip-hop, R&B, and reggae albums 20 + years after their release. They break these albums down to see if they stood the test of time. Listeners get a perspective on classics from a fresh point of view. The Vault: Classic Music Reviews also includes guest interviews, round table discussions, and artist catalog debates.