The 2009 IRAWMA Honors the Best in Caribbean & World Music

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IRAWMA Finale

The 2009 IRAWMA saw a star-studded affair at the York College
Performing Arts Center in Queens, New York on Sunday, May 3, 2009.

– Photography by Khayyam Pitts –

Rainy weather and cold temps did not put a damper on the 28th Annual International Reggae and World Music Awards, which took place at the state-of-the-art York College Performing Arts Center in Queens, New York on Sunday, May 3, 2009.

Celebrities filed into the venue hours before the show began, to walk the red carpet and give media their undivided attention. Then the curtains went up and the show was first emceed by Copeland Forbes, pinch hitting for Tony Rebel, who later turned up to take over his hosting duties.

The audience was entertained all night with exciting performances from some of the top names in Caribbean music, including Tarrus Riley, Calypso Rose, Beenie Man, Machel Montano, Alison Hinds,Tony Rebel, D’Angel, Gramps Morgan, Duane Stephenson and Barbee, all backed by the Dean Fraser Band.

The awards presentation saw some funny moments as fans screamed their choices and awardees teased each other. Beres Hammond, Mavado, Machel Montano, Queen Ifrica and Etana all walked away with two trophies each. Tarrus Riley won “Best Male Vocalist,” Beenie Man took away the “Best Male Deejay” prize, Alison Hinds scored “Best Calypso/Soca Entertainer,” Stephen McGregor nabbed “Producer of the Year,” and Shaggy was honored with the “Marcus Garvey Humanitarian Award.”

“I first want to extend a note of thanks to each and everyone for your hard work,” stated Ephraim Martin, president of Martin’s International & Associates and producer of the IRAWMA. “I value and appreciate all of your hard work and effort in making the 28th IRAWMA a success.” As the curtains closed on the 28th IRAWMA, everyone present at the awards applauded, paying respect to one of the longest running awards ceremony in the world that honors reggae and world beat music.

2009 IRAWMA Winners

Bob Marley Award for Entertainer of the Year
Beres Hammond

Recording Artist of the Year
Mavado

Best Male Vocalist
Tarrus Riley

Best Female Vocalist
Queen Ifrica & Etana (TIE)

Best Song
Mavado – “So Special”

Best Album
Etana – Strong One

Best Crossover Song
John Legend & Buju – “Can’t Be My Lover”

Best Gospel Song
Stitchie & Elephant Man – “What A Mighty God”

Best Female D.J./Rapper
Queen Ifrica

Best Male D.J./Rapper
Beenie Man

Best New Entertainer
Serani

Best Calypso/Soca Entertainer
Alison Hinds

Best Reggaeton Entertainer
Daddy Yankee

Best Latin Entertainer
Shakira

Best Compas Entertainer
Nu-Look

Best African Entertainer
Alpha Blondy

Best Soukous Entertainer
Awilo Longomba

Best Hip Hop/R&B Entertainer
Lil Wayne

Outstanding Contribution to World Music
Wyclef Jean

Most Outstanding Stage Personality
Machel Mantano

Best Music Video
Stephen & Damian Marley – “The Mission”

Best Poet
Mutabaruka

Most Educational Entertainer
Morgan Heritage

Most Outstanding Show Band
Machel & HD Band

Most Consistent Entertainer
Calypso Rose

Most Promising Entertainer
Lutan Fyah

Most Improved Entertainer
Tanya Mullings

Best Instrumentalist
Dean Fraser

Best Backing Band
New Kingston Band

Most Popular Selector
Stone Love

Concert of the Year
Irie Jamboree

Promoter of the Year
Sumfest

Producer of the Year
Steven McGregor

Songwriter of the Year
Beres Hammond

Award for Spiritual Service through Music
Lutan Fyah

Community Service Award
Ziggy Marley, U.R.G.E.

Marcus Garvey Humanitarian Award
Shaggy

Best Song in Tribute to Barack Obama
Cocoa Tea – “Barack Obama”

SPECIAL: Int’l Reggae & World Music Hall of Fame/Lifetime Inductee
Clive Hunt, King Short Shirt, Sweet Honey in the Rock

SPECIAL: Master of the Caribbean Award
Mighty Sparrow

SPECIAL: Martin’s International/Inter-Culture Award of Honor
Granville Straker

SPECIAL: Award for Contributions to Music, Arts & Culture
Hon. Olivia “Babsy” Grange
SPECIAL: Producer’s “Respect” Award
Usain Bolt
SPECIAL: Awards of Appreciation for Contributions to Music Industry
Owen Dalhouse, Brigadier Jerry, Road Int’l, Heavy D

For more information, please log on to www.irawma.com
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Cherine Anderson’s EP Release Making Waves

"Coming Over Tonight" Cherine Anders...
The wait is over…The Introduction ARRIVES!

Singer-Songwriter Cherine Anderson releases her EP, The Introduction-Dubstyle, via
Dancehall Soul Productions/Zlink Entertainment.

The East Kingston, Jamaica soulstress started 2009 with a bang by performing at three Barack Obama Inaugural Balls, performing at the World Special Olympics in Idaho, and is currently on tour supporting her first official release, The Introduction-Dubstyle EP. After spending the last seven months touring the US, Australia and Europe with the likes of Sly & Robbie, Michael Franti & Spearhead, Slightly Stoopid and Pepper, it’s clear that Anderson has been working hard and entertaining many fans with her infectious Dancehall Soul sound.

The Introduction-Dubstyle, available on iTunes, is a perfect combination of dancehall, soul and lover’s rock. The nine track EP boasts outstanding production from Grammy Award winning producers Sly & Robbie, hit makers David Norland (Madonna, Janet Jackson), Christopher Birch, Gussie Clarke and legendary mixing engineer Errol Brown (Bob Marley, Ziggy Marley), among others. The multi-faceted Anderson plays triple duty on the project, performing, writing on all nine songs and co-producing several tracks.

Anderson’s vocals are remarkable from song to song. Her powerful voice soars on anthems like “Shine On Jamaica” and the female anthem “Talk if Yuh Talking”. With lyrics cutting particular hard on the inspiring “Shine On Jamaica”, Anderson speaks to the realities of young black girls in the harsh inner city.

“two inches taller than di pram weh she a push har baby inna/
love di streets but she cyaan spell har baby father name/
a bleach out har face fi lighten har pain- ghetto reality”
-“Shine On Jamaica”

Her writing is thought provoking without being preachy.  The talent combines intellect with soulfulness, but never loses that feminine touch. Her youth is exposed on the sassy “Tuff Enuff” where she flirts with the boys and at the same time empowers the sisters.
In between her signature flirtatious giggles she asks,

“baby talk is cheap/only action speaks/words go skin deep so how bad do you want me?”
-“Tuff Enuff”

This reggaeton/dancehall flavored track picks up the tempo and will definitely make you move your feet, while chart-topping hits “Coming Over Tonight” and “Kingston State of Mind” should find favor with the hardcore roots lovers. Fans of the ‘King Tubbys’ dub-era will appreciate the extended drum and bass mixes on several cuts. The Introduction-Dubstyle is definitely an album for all ages.

Shortly after its online release, The Introduction-Dubstyle is already receiving rave reviews. According to CDBABY.COM, Anderson’s EP “…is strong throughout. It’s really great music that respects the traditions of reggae’s past, yet sounds totally modern.” As one of the most popular online retail sites for independent music, CDBABY.COM selected Anderson’s EP as their Editor’s Pick and will honored her debut project as their featured Editor’s Pick on their website on February 20.

Fans, friends and supporters of Cherine can get their copy of The Introduction-Dubstyle at the below mentioned sites. REMEMBER to log in and leave your review/comments. Support independent music and artists.

iTUNES
www.cdbaby.com/cherine
www.digstation.com

Contact: Cherine Management & Booking
Zlink Entertainment, Inc.
1121 N. Bethlehem Pk., Ste. 60-292
Springhouse PA 19477
215.628.3109 USA
876.396.6849 JAMAICA
www.myspace.com/cherineanderson

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Cherine Anderson In Washington For Celebration of Barack Obama

The twenty-something talent is excited about performing in Washington, come January 19 and 20, as part of the celebrations to welcome North America’s 44th president, Barack Obama into office.

“The song is called Barack Obama, which features reggae-rocker Michael Frenti and hip-hop group Soliloquists of Sound,” Anderson tells Splash in an interview on Wednesday.

“We never recorded it, we just did it live in a couple of spots,” she says, “a couple of people from Obama’s camp saw us performing and became really excited about it and made a couple calls.”

That aside, Anderson is also excited about her first official project – an eight-track EP – which is set to be released during this holiday season.

“We decided to put it out in order to give fans a taste of what to expect on Kingston State Of Mind,” Anderson says of the EP aptly titled The Introduction Dub Style.

With well-rotated singles like Good Love, Coming Over Tonight (featuring Chuck Fenda) and an ambitious mixtape Street Anthems behind her, Anderson is hopeful that the “new stuff” on the EP will go over well with her listeners. And if her tours are anything to go by, it already is.

“We’ve been getting really good feedback from the tours, Australia, Europe and North America. I believe there is even greater anticipation for the album now.”

The Introduction – the first project on her still-new Dancehall Soul label – she says is currently available at her shows only, but should be available at online stores like iTunes and Amazon before year-end.

And speaking of the year, Anderson admits she’s had a great one, since ace producers David Norland (who has worked with Madonna) and local heavy-hitters Sly & Robbie have been behind all her productions.

“Right now I’m just busy, busy promoting my new singles Shine On Jamaica and Talk If Yuh Talking,” Anderson adds, “they’re both songs to encourage and uplift and Jamaica needs that right now!”

What’s next for the bluesy ‘divette’? Lots she tells us. “It’s back to Philadelphia this weekend, doing some work with Wyclef Jean. got a couple shows to do in Vancouver, Canada ahead of Washington in January,” Anderson notes. But her busy schedule and spending Christmas away from her loved ones on The Rock seem a small price to pay for the sake of her art.

“I’m having so much fun, 2008 has totally surpassed everything that I expected. I’m having the time of my life.”


SOURCE: dubtunes.com

Luciano rushed off stage in Atlanta

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Review of Spiritual Fyah with Luciano, Queen Ifrica, and Tony Rebel, 11/8/08 at Club Intrigue in Stone Mountain, GA.

 

The Setting

 

First off let me say for the record that since the mid 1990’s, when asked which artist puts on the best live stage show performance, my answer was and is Luciano.  I found out that he was going to be performing in Atlanta through word of mouth the day before the concert and decided to go since it had been a while since I attended a stage show.  Knowing that Caribbean events in Stone Mountain typically start late, I was in no rush to arrive.  I got inside Club Intrigue at around 2am after paying $30.  I had no problem forking up the money, because after all, it was for Luciano – my favorite live performer.  At that time there was a short line outside and the venue, which can hold approximately 1000 people was about half full.  More people continued to arrive over the next couple hours but the club wasn’t packed at all.

 

English: Photo of Tony Rebel, Jamaican reggae ...

English: Photo of Tony Rebel, Jamaican reggae legend (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The Early Warm (part 1)

 

Local sound man, Danger Marcus finished up his set on the turntables and turned the controls over to Adonai Sound from Jamaica.  Dred from Adonai selected and mixed, while Atlanta’s Mix Master David acted as MC.  Adonai’s Dred started out with some foundation music, but then brought it to more recent conscious and lover’s rock reggae before starting to juggle with songs like ‘Living Dangerously‘ by Bounty Killer featuring Barrington Levy.  The music was decent though I would have liked to hear more culture played since it was a culture show.  Also, Mix Master David’s specialty is mixing, hence his name, and he struggled to connect with the audience while talking over music being played by the Adonai.  I don’t recall any forwards (big crowd responses) being achieved.

 

The Early Warm (part 2)

 

At around 3am, the stage show began with opening acts performing dirty south style hip-hop.  The first 4 acts took the stage rapping about various subject matter unrelated to the theme of the night (Spiritual Fyah), performing at least 2-3 songs each which made me think to myself, among other questions, “are the promoters familiar with the music of Luciano at all?”  After that the MC introduced Fire Harp, the first reggae artist, followed by Ras Idon, Ishmael Turner, and a female duet that reminded me of the group Floetry called Last Lyricists.  These performances were good and much more appropriate, but I think this whole portion of the show was too long.  Standing up and watching 8 artists you have never heard of sing songs you never heard before for over an hour doesn’t exactly energize a crowd, especially at that time of morning.

 

More Earlies

 

The MC then announced that the DJ would take over for a while until the remaining artists were ready to take the stage so Nolan from King Eternity began to select and was joined by Danger Marcus as MC.  I think Danger Marcus was better than Mix Master David as he ventured away from the DJ booth in the corner of the stage out to front stage a few times to interact with the crowd.  He had more energy, but It didn’t transfer over to the audience.  This whole time, the majority of the people were at the back of the club, near the bar or in the far corners so it was pretty empty in front of the stage and on the main dance-floor.  During his set, Nolan selected 2002 – 2003 tunes and juggled on riddims like Diwali, Buyout and the Buzz at 4 o’clock in the morning.  The selection was not fitting with the theme of the night in general and this prevented the vibes from reaching anywhere.  I still can’t believe that I heard no Beres Hammond, Garnett Silk, Capleton, conscious Sizzla… No Anthony B, Everton Blender, Chuck Fender, Bob Marley or any other Marley…  You get my drift.

 

Showtime

 

It is at this point that the event started suffering from attrition and people began to trickle out one by one.  I am sure patrons wondered if the artists they had paid to see were even in Atlanta at all, I know I did.  Eventually the MC came back on stage to resume the stage show after the long break and brought out Anthony Malvo.  There was still no band in sight, but at least there was a known reggae artist.  Anthony Malvo was able to entertain the crowd singing covers of different reggae hits mostly, and his biggest response was in tribute to the late great Alton Ellis.

 

It was great to see band members emerge and take there place along with Delly who travelled from Jamaica to be the official MC/host.  It was around 5am now, and whoever had stuck around that long had to be glad to know that Luciano would be coming out soon.  Delly then introduced Papa Michi, Michigan from the foundation DJ duo Michigan and Smiley.  I was shocked just to see this artist still performing at his age, but he went through some covers, another Alton Ellis tribute with the same songs Anthony Malvo sang, and also performed the 1980 hit, Diseases.  Not bad at all, I just wished it was at least 3 hours earlier.

 

 

Star time

 

Queen Ifrica touched the stage and pulled stragglers in from the far corners of Club Intrigue to the front of the stage.  She was well received and sang all her hits from the past 2 years, stopping only to give relevant speeches and introduce her songs like a pro.  She worked well with the band and stayed on stage for approximately 30 minutes, ending off with her current hit tune, ‘Keep it to Yourself.’  Her performance was short and sweet.

 

Tony Rebel was up next.  Rebel Tony showed poise and veteranship while on stage.  He immediatley commanced attention from the crowd and went through the hits that he is know for globally, including Fresh Vegetable, Chatty Chatty, and If Jah.  He also gave some lyrics about the rise of President Barack Obama to bring it current.  Tony Rebel’s segment was longer than Queen Ifrica’s – I’d say about 45 minutes, which meant that now it was 6:30am.

 

Luciano took the stage to close the show and was well worth the wait.  I will continue to support this artist because of the vibes and energy he puts into his shows.  He skanked, jumped, and tumbled across the stage.  He prayed for Barack Obama and gave good reports from his trip to Kenya, which was during the time of the recent Presidential election in the US.  Luci did hits from different albums, but while singing Glory Be, given the signal that he had to leave to catch his plane.  His performance ended up being not much longer than some of the opening acts which is sad, however in the short time he was on stage (at almost 7am) he was still able to completely energize the audience and get everyone back onto their feet and in a vibes.  Then he stopped the last song and had the band start over, playing low so he could at least finish properly, kneeling down to say a prayer in the process.  The Messenger Luciano shook the hands of all who were near enough to the stage and posed for pictures as if truly grateful for the opportunity to carry out his life mission – to spread Jah love and a conscious message through singing.

 

Please share your comments on these artists, concerts or events you have been to, etc.  I will be breaking down the Atlanta dancehall scene in depth in future posts so you will want to stay tuned, trust me.  That’s all for now.

 

 

 

More people listen to dancehall now

On this week’s show we feature more new music of course and yes, more people are listening.  Check the playlist below and here’s the direct link to the new show. You can right-click and Save As to download the file, or just left-click to listen now: http://stuff.highlanda.net/rss/podcast/s2/Dancehall_Now_Episode_3.mp3

If you like what you hear visit the Highlanda.net podcast page and subscribe to get automatic updates sent to you each week. Hopefully you will, and hopefully you subscribe to this blog too.  We are getting good feedback so far.  Please continue to contact us with requests and comments.

Dancehall Now Episode 3
Wednesday, October 29, 2008 5:08 AM

1   Need You Bad – Jazmine Sullivan
2   Jail – Busy Signal
3   Real Jamaican – Mykal Rose featuring Busy Signal
4   Me Nuh Give a – Timberlee
5   Gal dem tired – Buju Banton
6   Gal A You – Demarco
7   Hand up – Determine
8   Style Dem – General B
9   Know Long Time – Zebra
10  Love LockDown – Kanye West
11  So Special – Mavado
12  Kill Dem All – Bounty Killer
13  I Can Feel Your Pain – Gyptian
14  In Your Eyes – Sanchez
15  She Loves Me – Serani
16  The Mission – Stephen Marley featuring Damian Marley
17  We Need Barack – Mavado featuting Barack Obama
18  Nuh Linga – Elephant Man
19  Long Distance Girlfriend – Heavy D
20  Money Fi Spend – Vybes Kartel
21  Keep It To Yourself – Queen Ifrica
22  The Way You Make Me Feel – Serani
23  Street Life – K, Salaam featuring Trey Songz & Buju Banton
24  100 Stab – Aidonia
25  Tic Toc – Busy Signal
26  I Feel Good – Beres Hammond
27  Barack Obama – Cocoa Tea

4th Annual Vintage Fest in NYC

JAMROCK Magazine proudly presents the 4th annual Vintage Fest at the world renowned Hammerstein Ballroom, Saturday Dec. 6th. The show stars classic reggae acts John Holt, Cocoa Tea, Leroy Sibbles, Sugar Minott, Carlton Livingston, Brigadier Jerry and U-Roy.  A classic line up for vintage Reggae lovers. Be ready to rock steady.

4th Annual Vintage Fest Poster

4th Annual Vintage Fest Poster

Returning to the Vintage Fest stage in high demand by the people, John Holt has delivered timeless reggae classics like Police in Helicopter, Stick by Me, and Ali Baba. In height the U.S. political season Cocoa Tea lent his voice in support of Senator Barack Obama’s presidential campaign with his song Barack Obama, now the sweet sounds of Cocoa Tea will hit the Hammerstein with the same zeal for his fans with songs like Rocker’s Island and Lost My Sonia. Legendary bassist and vocalist Leroy Sibbles is bound to sing signature Heptones tunes like Baby and Fattie, Fattie. Singer, songwriter, Sugar Minott has had countless hits and a timeless catalogue sure to please fans. Dancehall’s originator U-Roy, affectionately known as Daddy U-Roy, will play on his classic lyrical toasting for true dancehall fans with hits like Runaway Girl, Natty Rebel and Wake the Town For the first time on stage at Vintage Fest, dub singer Carlton Livingston and classic dancehall DJ Brigadier Jerry are bound to give the audience a performance not to be missed!

Set to transport New York City on December 6, 2008 into a time where some of the best musical memories lie, the 4th Annual Vintage Fest features the best in reggae and dancehall capturing the essence of the music’s innovators.

Tickets are available through Ticketmaster.com and reggaefest.com. To purchase tickets by phone please call 212-307-7171 or 718-325-5555 respectively. Doors open at 7pm, show starts promptly at 8pm.