Reggae Vault Classics Features Henry “Junjo” Lawes & Hits From Volcano

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Reggae Vault Classics highlights legendary reggae music producer Henry “Junjo” Lawes and spins hit songs from his Volcano Record Label in this Featured Icon Segment by Highlanda Sound.

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Playlist

1  Kingdom Rise and Kingdom Fall – The Wailing Souls

2  Firehouse Rock (Waterhouse Rock) – The Wailing Souls

3  Give Another Israel A Try – Barry Brown

4  Ganja Dub – Scientist

5  Police In HelicopterJohn Holt

6  Bible Story – Early B

7  Sister Carol – Barrington Levy

8  Bubbling Telephone – Charlie Chaplin

9  Ice Cream Love – Johnny Osborne

10 Lost Mi Love – Yellowman

11 Miss Know It All – Scientist

12 Come Fe Mash It – Tony Tuff

13 Who Can Make The Dance Ram – Yellowman

14 21 Girls Salute – Barrington Levy

15 Rocking DollyCocoa Tea

16 I Am The Don – Leroy Smart

17 Mr. Chin – Yellowman

18 Bam Bam – Yellowman & Fathead

19 Virgin Girl (A Wha Do Dem) – Eek-A-Mouse

20 Prison Oval Rock – Barrington Levy

21 Hog and Goat – Don Carlos

22 Gunman – Michael Prophet

23 Stealing – John Holt

24 Nobody Move Noboby Get Hurt – Yellowman

25 Jam Dance Master – Yellowman

26 Pass The Kushungpeng – Frankie Paul

27 Worries In The Dance – Frankie Paul

28 Zunguzunguguzungguzeng – Frankie Paul

king yellowman

king yellowman (Photo credit: cultchas)

 

In these times turn to ‘The Book of Life’

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One of the reasons I love foundation (reggae) music is because of how the messages brought forth in songs recorded decades ago still can be applied directly to life today. Many of the lyrics and concepts are actually quotes from biblical texts sung over reggae bass lines. The Highlanda mixtape entitled ‘The Book of Life’ is dedicated to such selections from the Finest Years era and offers the wisdom of the ancients to those who will listen. ‘That’s right! If a reality you want, let me hear you shout out Highlanda!’ Listen to the Book of Life, now streaming online at www.highlanda.net. This mix will also be available as an mp3 file for download on demand soon. I welcome your comments and feedback.

Song List
1 – Intro – Tings Change
2 – Armageddon Time – Willie Williams
3 – Fussing and Fighting – Dennis Brown
4 – Cool Out Son – Junior Murvin
5 – No Man’s Land – Cornell Campbell
6 – Tribal War – John Holt
7 – Wolves and Leopards – Dennis Brown
8 – Whip Them Jah Jah – Dennis Brown
9 – No Man is an Island – Dennis Brown
10 – Never Gonna Give Jah Up – Sugar Minott
11 – Created By the Father – Dennis Brown
12 – Feeling Soul – Bob Andy
13 – Police and Thieves – Junior Murvin
14 – Satisfy My Soul – Bob Marley and the Wailers
15 – Slave Driver – Bob Marley and the Wailers

16 – I am the Conqueror – Dennis Brown
17 – Rebel Music – Bob Marley and the Wailers
18 – General Penitentiary – Black Uhuru
19 – Were Gonna Fight – The Heptones
20 – Fade Away – Junior Byles
21 – Unchained – Bob Andy
22 – Hog and Goat – Don Carlos
23 – Cost of Living – Half Pint
24 – Early Sunday Morning – Eek A Mouse
25 – Praise Jehovah – Tenor Saw
26 – Ruff Ole Life – Sugar Minott
27 – M-16 – Sammy Dread
28 – Rudeboy Skanking – Israel Vibration
29 – Skylarking – Horace Andy
30 – See A Man’s Face – Horace Andy

31 – Truths and Rights – Johnny Osborne
32 – Mr. Bassie – Horace Andy
33 – I Need A Roof – The Mighty Diamonds
34 – Jah Promise – Johnny Osborne
35 – Bobby Babylon – Freddie McGregor
36 – I Shall Sing – Marcia Griffiths
37 – Better Must Come – Delroy Wilson
38 – None Shall Escape – Johnny Clarke

Kahlil Wonda on ‘The Finest Years’ of Reggae Music

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The period beginning in the 1960’s on up through the 1980’s is what I refer to as The Finest Years of reggae music.  I sometimes include also the 1990’s.  The Finest Years includes many styles of the genre, from very grass-roots productions such as those of Studio One in Jamaica and Treasure Isle in the UK to the computerized creations of Jammy’s and Digital B in the 80’s and early 90’s.  These are some of my favorite selections as a consumer and Disc Jockey alike.  I pride myself as a collector and will never, ever, ever part with my musical treasure – original 12″, 10″, and 7″ records.

The Finest Years - classic reggae mix CD cover
The Finest Years – classic reggae mix CD cover

Click the Image to Download.

Although I don’t think its my very best mixing, this 100% vinyl mix is well selected and flows nicely from start to finish with some very nice transitions from song to song.  The sound quality is very good considering the age of some of the records being played, although I think the sound effects are sometimes too loud, especially for the type of songs being played.

The Finest Years - classic reggae mix CD cover
The Finest Years – classic reggae mix CD cover

The Finest Years mix begins with Ken Boothe’s ‘Everything I Own,’ which I use at the beginning to immediately set the tone. The first blend brings in Alton Ellis singing ‘I’m Just A Guy’ on the Studio One label. At this point you can really hear some hissing and popping from the needle travelling along the grooves of the original 45 (7″ record played at 45rpms). ‘Love and Devotion’ sung by Jimmy Riley (Tarrus Riley’s father for those who don’t know) is next followed by Eek A Mouse’s ‘Virgin Girl,’ a Volcano recording.

The mix steps up pace just a bit now as I draw for “I’m Still in Love” sung by Marcia Aitken and produced by the legendary Joe Gibbs. This tune was made popular recently by Sean Paul and Sasha. For all dub lovers I feature Studio One’s Ken Booth 45 of ‘When I Fall In Dub,’ (look for more dub featured on mixes coming soon). One good Studio One deserves another so another blend begins and The Heptones sing ‘Pretty Looks’ for us. Next is the first song from Dennis Emmanuel Brown, The Crown Prince of Reggae, ‘Sitting and Watching,’ followed by the Empress of Reggae, Marcia Griffiths with ‘Feel Like Jumping.’

The mix then goes into a vintage classic, ‘Loving Pauper,’ by Dobby Dobson. I remember drawing tunes like this in the early days of Highlanda to the surprise and praise of the elders in the community who asked “is how you know dem tune ya?” The Heptones’ ‘Sitting In the Park’ mixes in right on beat and ushers in more nostalgia before again the voice of Mr. D. Brown is featured with ‘Have You Ever.’ I had to let this one play for a while before transitioning smoothly into ‘I’ve Got The Handle,’ another Heptones Studio One classic, then Freddie McGregor’s version of ‘Let Him Try.’

The blend that follows is crucial as it brings across to your speakers the voices of Bob Andy and Marcia Griffiths with ‘Always Together,’ a lover’s anthem recorded at Studio One. I had to feature some Bob Marley so the next blend is into ‘Nice Time,’ original Tuff Gong 45 and from there back to Studio One with Alton Ellis ‘Breaking Up.’ To keep things interesting next up is ‘Can’t Stop Loving You’ by Freddie McGregor and ‘Missing You’ by Dennis Brown, (This Dennis Brown version was recorded at Don 1 studios in Brooklyn, New York) and Cocoa Tea‘s ‘Tune In’ on the Far East riddim. Volcano label 45 ‘Rocking Dolly‘ also by Cocoa Tea blends in smoothly next followed by another Cocoa Tea hit ‘She Loves Me Now.’

For many what follows is the sweetest part of The Finest Years mix. 6 Dennis Browns in a row blended masterfully starting with the Joe Gibbs dub version of ‘Money In My Pocket’ and moving into the original version, then ‘Silhoutte,’ ‘Take It Easy,’ ‘Caress Me Girl,’ ‘How Could I Leave,’ and ‘Rocking Time.’ Thank you D. Brown, we love you!

The next 4 songs are from Studio One: ‘Party Time’ by the Heptones, ‘Truly,’ by Marcia Griffiths, ‘Play Play Girl,’ by Johnny Osborne, and ‘Fatty Fatty,’ by Alton Ellis. Then an all-time favorite of mine ‘Friends for Life,’ is performed by Dennis Brown followed by The Melodians with ‘Come On Little Girl,’ and Cornell Campbell with ‘Boxing,’ another Joe Gibbs masterpiece. Featuring one more Freddie McGregor, the mix transitions into ‘I Was Born A Winner,’ and serious rockers tune ‘Keep On Knocking’ by Jacob Miller. The Finest Years closes out with Gregory Issacs‘s ‘Number One,’ and the classic ballad by Junior Byles, ‘Curley Lox.’

Thank you for reading and more importantly thank you for listening. The purpose of this blog post is for the education of those who seek to learn more about this powerful force, this divine gift of reggae.

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