Anita Antoinette Named Musical Ambassador for Nat’l Caribbean American Heritage Month

Anita Antoinette to be Musical Ambassador for Celebration of June National Caribbean American Heritage Month 2016

June National Caribbean American Heritage Month 2016

Anita Antoinette, Musical Ambassador for National Caribbean American Heritage Month 2016

The Institute of Caribbean Studies (ICS), the nation’s leading Caribbean American advocacy and development organization, is pleased to announce that Anita Antoinette, who captured the attention of millions on the 7 th season of “The Voice”, will serve as the Musical Ambassador for Caribbean American Heritage Month in 2016. Ms. Antoinette joins the ranks of CenCe, and URIM 7 as fresh voices who have served as Musical Ambassador since the program’s founding in 2013.

Anita grew up dancing to the rhythm of her father’s music Clinton Fearon, a member of The Gladiators, a Jamaican roots reggae band, most popular during the 1970s in Kingston, Jamaica. Self-taught singer and guitarist, Anita began writing her own music as a teenager, inspired both by her father and other legends, including Bob Marley, India Arie, and Erykah Badu. She graduated from the prestigious Greater Hartford Academy of the Arts in 2008, and was accepted to the Berklee College of Music in Boston, Massachusetts, where she earned a Bachelors Degree in Professional Music with a Concentration in Music Business and Songwriting.

Anita Antoinette has performed on stages large and small throughout New England, the Northeast and the Pacific Northwest, including 2008 appearance at the Library of Congress in Washington DC. She appeared on the 7th season of NBC’s hit show, “The Voice”, placing in the TOP TEN, and easily became one of the most loved and talked about performers. Antoinette who has been working on producing her first EP since The Voice will be launching a single “CARE” from the EP which will serve as her platform for JUNE.

“We are absolutely delighted to have Anita Antoinette as Musical Ambassador for 2016. She represents the new consciousness arising in the next generation of leaders in the Caribbean American community”, stated Dr. Claire Nelson, ICS President & Founder. “Her poise and integrity shone through on the voice, and we anticipate that her artistic acumen will continue to be burnished as her star rises”.

National Caribbean American Heritage Month has been celebrated annually every June since 2006. For ICS, it represents an opportunity to bring together Caribbean American community leaders across the country to address common concerns; to allow Caribbean Americans everywhere to feel a sense of place in the American public discourse; and to bring highlights to the contributions past, present and future being made by Caribbean immigrants to the USA. ICS, the architect of the Campaign to Celebrate June as National Caribbean American Heritage Month (NCAHM) now has partners in twenty cities and locales across the country from Atlanta to New Orleans to Los Angeles.

To interview Anita Antoinette or secure her for a performance, please contact Shelley at redcarpetshelley.com 404-618-5018.

For more information please visit our website at www.caribbeanamericanmonth.org.

About the ICS:

The Institute of Caribbean Studies (ICS), founded in 1993, is the architect and campaign chair for commemoration of June as National Caribbean American Heritage Month, established by President George Bush in 2006. ICS is a non-partisan, non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization founded by Dr. Claire A. Nelson, White House Champion of Change. The premiere CaribbeanAmerican Think/Do Tank, ICS seeks to address development challenges facing Caribbean peoples, and to adopt a thorough, systematic and coordinated long-term perspective towards their resolution. To learn more about Caribbean American Heritage Month and the Institute of Caribbean Studies please visit our website.

Advertisements

Janelle Monae & Erykah Badu Stylish New Joint!

We are feeling an incredible buzz for “Q.U.E.E.N.” the new single by Janelle Monae and Erykah Badu. Here’s the official music video.

Stephen Marley: Reggae, Guitars and His Father’s Legacy

4

“There’s a simple explanation,” says Stephen Marley, with a laugh. “It’s called DNA.”

Just about everyone agrees: of all the children of Bob Marley, Stephen received the lion’s share of his father’s musical genes. As the family’s “go-to” producer, the 36-year-old has earned a slew of Grammys for his work through the years. More than that, however, Marley simply sounds like his father. As evidenced on Mind Control, his 2007 debut album, his voice bears an uncanny resemblance to that of reggae’s greatest practitioner.

All that said, however, Marley has proved adept at pushing the boundaries of traditional reggae. On the pioneering 1999 reggae/hip-hop fusion album Chant Down Babylon, and on his brother Damian’s Grammy-winning Welcome to Jamrock, the producer-songwriter wove a mix of contemporary styles into reggae’s solid foundation. And even on Mind Control, on trip-hop flavored tracks like “Hey Baby” and “Traffic Jam,” he sometimes sounds like a modern-day equivalent of madman reggae pioneer Lee Perry.

Just as important, Marley seems to have inherited his father’s formidable work ethic. In the midst of a mini-tour, and with several projects in progress, he spoke with us about his music, his guitars, and why he likes country-western songs.

How did you become the go-to guy for most of the family’s projects? Does it have more to do with your personality, or with your musical versatility?

It’s more about my personality. I’m the member of the family who was born in April. In the Bible, April is from the tribe of Reubin. Reubin was the first son of Jacob. That type of personality — being a leader, a big brother — is part of me.

Which do you enjoy more working on a project of your own, or working on someone else’s project, where you’re sort of behind the curtain?

It’s hard to say. Everything we do is done the same way. Obviously there are small differences, but with the Mind Control project, for example, Damian and Julian were there with me. Nothing changes, really, in our approach.

Is it different working with members of your family, as opposed to working with people with whom you aren’t related?

It is different. There’s more of a bond in the conception, with family. Everyone kind of thinks on the same wavelength. Working with people outside the family involves communication that has to be sort of broken down.

Looking back, the Chant Down Babylon album, where you incorporated hip-hop into your father’s songs, seems especially significant. Did you have reservations about doing that?

Yes. We were very cautious, but the relevance of that record was very important. The way it came together, it was clear it was meant to be. For example, we were in the studio talking about Erykah Badu (http://www.erykahbadu.com/), and she just happened to come to tour the Bob Marley Museum at the same time. I said, “You know, we were just talking about you.” I told her about the project and she came on-board. It was effortless.

Do you think your father would have been a fan of hip-hop?

Yes, mon. He was a big fan of dancehall music. He liked Big Youth and Dillinger — those types of artists.

People might be surprised to learn that you’re a big fan of country-western music.

Yeah, very much. Country music reminds me a lot of Jamaican folks who live in the country. Music with just an acoustic guitar, or a banjo, has that folk style, where most of the songs tell stories. A lot of Jamaicans love country music. Back in the ’70s and early ’80s there was a lot of country music there — Kenny Rogers and so forth.

When you begin work on a song, which of your guitars do you usually pick up?

It’s usually an acoustic guitar, usually an Ovation. But on-stage I play a Gibson, a Les Paul Custom. And now I have my first Gibson acoustic. It’s a beautiful guitar. I’ve been playing it a lot while I’ve been out on the road — getting to know her, so to speak. I’ve been writing on the Gibson acoustic a bit as well.

Your father also played Les Pauls. Do you still have his guitars?
Yes, the family has them. He used to call his main Les Paul “Old Faithful.” He would tell us children, “Go and bring ‘Old Faithful’ to me.”

Do you ever use his guitars in the studio?

Sometimes.

Your father had an incredibly strong work ethic, which is something you seem to have inherited.

We inherited the lessons from that, in the sense of knowing what a strong work ethic brings. After that, it’s up to you, whether you want to work hard or not. Seeing the results of my father’s hard work — what that hard work brought — is the best lesson we learned. If we want similar results, then we too have to work hard too.

His legacy has never seemed burdensome to you. Instead, you’ve always seemed to cherish the responsibility that goes along with that.

That’s true. That responsibility makes you a better person. It keeps you in line, and helps you in life. It helps you in life because his example is so positive.

Source: Gibson.com

 

Enhanced by Zemanta