Bob Marley’s favorite singer: Jacob Miller

Jamaican reggae artist and Rastafari musician, nicknamed Jacob “Killa” Miller. Inner Circle lead singer, Jacob was a legendary Reggae singer with an exciting stage presence and memorable voice.

HIGHLANDA SOUND #Reggae 123 - Reggae Lover - Jacob Miller

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Listen to songs from Jacob Miller like Tenement Yard, Healing of the Nation & more.

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The Top Reggae Bands of All Time | Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 74

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I curated some of the biggest hits from legendary bands: Third World, Israel Vibration, Inner Circle, Aswad, Black Uhuru, and Steel Pulse – groups who have presented fabulous reggae music performances and recordings for nearly half a century.

Reggae Lover Podcast

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Third World is a Jamaican reggae band formed in 1973. Their sound is influenced by soul, funk, and disco. Although it has undergone several line-up changes, Stephen “Cat” Coore and Richard Daley have been constant members.

Steel Pulse is a roots reggae musical band, from the Handsworth area of Birmingham, England, which has a large number of Afro-Caribbean, Indian and other Asian migrants. They originally formed at Handsworth Wood Boys School – composed of David Hinds (lead vocals, guitar), Basil Gabbidon (lead guitar, vocals), and Ronald McQueen (bass); along with Basil’s brother Colin briefly on drums. Steel Pulse was the first non-Jamaican act to win the Grammy Award for Best Reggae Album.

Black Uhuru is a Jamaican reggae group formed in 1972, initially as Uhuru (Swahili for ‘freedom’). The group has undergone several line-up changes over the years, with Derrick “Duckie” Simpson as the mainstay. They had their most successful period in the 1980s, with their album Anthem winning the first ever Grammy Award for Best Reggae Album in 1985.

Aswad is a long-lasting British reggae group, noted for adding strong R&B and soul influences to the reggae sound. They have been performing since the mid-1970s, having released a total of 21 albums. “Aswad” means “black” in Arabic.

Inner Circle is a Jamaican reggae group. The group was originally called The Inner Circle Band and formed in 1968. The band achieved major success in the 1970s with Jacob Miller as their lead singer but split up after his death in 1980. They reformed in 1986 and had a major hit with the 1987 song “Bad Boys”, which serves as the theme song for the long-running Spike (formerly Fox Network) television program COPS.[1] They are also well known for their song “Sweat (A La La La La Long),” a big hit in the U.S. in the early 1990s. The band is known for blending pop and rock with reggae.

Israel Vibration is a reggae harmony group, originating from Kingston, Jamaica. Lascelle “Wiss” Bulgin, Albert “Apple Gabriel” Craig, and Cecil “Skelly” Spence all overcame childhood polio and went on to be one of the most successful roots groups to form in Jamaica in the 1970s. The trio initially met as children at a rehabilitation center.

I would also want to make mention of bands like Fab 5, UB40, Big Mountain, SOJA, Tribal Seeds, Raging Fyah, and there are and have been 1000’s of musical ensembles that dedicated themselves to pushing the reggae music envelope. Big ups to all singers and players of instruments.

Welcome To Jamrock live 3-20-15 from Studio No. 7 *audio download*

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Welcome to the first reggae lover podcast episode of Spring 2015, marking the show’s one year anniversary. I have nothing but appreciation for those of you who listen to and support my podcast. I am in the process of moving and setting up a new studio to be able to continue producing this content so there have been some delays, but that will be over soon. Expect more unique mixes and informative updates to come your way on a weekly basis right here.

This mix was recorded live at Studio No. 7 in Atlanta on Friday March 20, 2015 where I represent the theme “Welcome To Jamrock.” This is a refreshing 100% reggae excursion where tunes and good vibes flow all night – a true reggae lover’s event in Atlanta.

This audio portion begins with 3 Protoje collaborations off the new ‘Ancient Future’ album featuring Chronixx, Kabaka Pyramid, Jesse Royal, and Sevana. Also in the mix, hear from Bob Marley and the Wailers, Dennis Brown, Barrington Levy, Sluggy Ranks, Luciano, Sizzla, Inner Circle, Beres Hammond and many more.

The Reggae Defenders

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This Reggae Lover Podcast episode opens with the leader of the reggae revival Protoje explaining that he makes music from his heart and not for the charts. Sizzla can be heard begging “Please do not mash up the dance.” George Nooks and Mikey Spice tell stories about having a good time in the dancehall. Alborosie excerpts that Reggae and rubadub music still rock the dancehall to this day.

Garnett Silk compares music to the rod that Moses walked with as he led the Father’s people to the promised land. Luciano sings about the many positive effects of reggae music on the body and mind. Richie Stephens and U-Roy sing out about the nicest times when real reggae music used to play.

Bryan Art describes the love and confidence that overcomes one when entering the dancehall. Christopher Martin paints the picture of a reggae road block where people are dancing in the streets, creating the perfect chill spot. Crooner Kashief Lindo shares a bit of his personal story on the song “Music Is A Part Of Me.”

Steel Pulse, Dubtonic Kru, Gramps Morgan, XO, Hero and Richie Spice all give their take on why Reggae music is so good and what it means to them. Busy Signal goes in about how everybody smiles and unites when positive reggae music is played.

Gentleman teams with Sugar Minott to reminisce about the good old days when there was no drama and the musical foundation imparted love and good vibes. Inner Circle alongside The Reggae Wave sing in defense of the genre.

Inner Circle at Jamaica 50th Anniv. Celebration in NYC w/ Israel Vibration & The Mighty Diamonds

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Inner Circle / Israel Vibration / The Mighty Diamonds / DJ Carter Van Pelt
8.19.2012 | 3:00 pm – 7:00 pm | Central Park | Directions to Event >

     Celebrate Jamaica’s 50th anniversary of independence with this day of Jamaican reggae music.

To anyone who’s familiar with Inner Circle, the GRAMMY® winning band’s 20-year-plusInner Circle history in reggae has had a long string of successes. Inner Circle’s special brand of pop-oriented Jamaican beats and energy-filled live performances have allowed the band to transcend the traditional reggae niche and enjoy widespread crossover appeal. From the launch of their first album in 1978 entitled, Everything Is Great, to the launch of the album, Bad Boys which became an international hit featuring the title track as well as the dance party favorite “Sweat,” Inner Circle’s brand of unforgettable hooks and island beats has kept the band a mainstay in the reggae world.

The story of reggae group Israel Vibration‘s success starts out with their humble beginnings as children battling polio in a Jamaican rehabilitation center. Cecil Spence (Skelly) and Lascelle Bulgin (Wiss) bonded through music while in the clinic and quickly became friends. As the duo got older, they found the faith of Rastafari and created songs which expressed their spiritual beliefs. Since then, the duo’s music has been spellbinding audiences for over two decades with their mix of traditional roots reggae and deeply spiritual messages such as the critically acclaimed album, On The Rock and its follow-up Free To Move, which reached number one on the CMJ New World charts.

The Mighty Diamonds are the most consistent and long-running reggae trio in Jamaican musical history. For over forty years the group has been entertaining and educating the world with their conscious lyrics, soulful harmonies and polished performances that led them to become known as the reggae group with the Motown sound. Their debut album Right Time, has become a reggae classic while the single, “Pass the Kutchie” from the album Changes, became an international hit and has since been covered by reggae group, Musical Youth whose version “Pass the Dutchie” also garnered fame globally. With over forty albums released, the group remains a favorite of the dance hall crowd, roots and progressive audiences.

Head DJ of ESummer Stageastern Standard Time on WKCR 89.9 FM in New York CityDJ Carter Van Pelt is a true student of Jamaican music of every era, from ska to dancehall. He’ll celebrate Jamaica’s 50th Anniversary with far-ranging selections covering every era. His WKCR program has earned a worldwide reputation for bringing artists to the studio for historic interviews, augmented with deep cuts, all played from vinyl. Van Pelt is the founder/producer of the popular Coney Island Reggae Soundsystem Series, held each summer on the iconic Coney Island Boardwalk. He also hosts a program on the Internet station Radio Lily.

Event Website:  http://innercircle-reggae.com

Inner Circle Official Youtube Channel: http://youtube.com/BadBoysofReggae

Inner Circle Official Twitter: http://twitter.com/BadBoysofReggae

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INNER CIRCLE & ALI CAMPBELL OF UB40 IN MEDELLIN, COLOMBIA
Inner Circle In Columbia

CLICK BELOW TO WATCH VIDEO

Inner Circle In Columbia

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Reggae Vault Classics 27 – Extended 1990’s Mix

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This is the latest episode of the syndicated Reggae Vault Classics podcast produced for promotional purposes only by Highlanda Sound for September 23, 2009 featuring classic reggae music in a radio broadcast mix-show format.

This episode of Reggae Vault Classics includes excepts from The Vault Classics Radio show which can be heard on Da Flava Radio Wednesdays at 7pm EST.

Right Click the file and select “Save As…” to download the entire mp3 file or just click to listen to the audio stream now.  We sincerely hope you enjoy the selections and mixing.  Please send your comments, feedback, and requests to podcast@highlanda.net or feel free to comment here.

Direct mp3 Download Link (right click and “save as”)

Playlist:

1   Dances Are Changes – Barrington Levy
2   All Over Me – Little John
3   Are You Still In Love – Sanchez
4   Miss Goodie Goodie – Colin Roach and Galaxy P
5   Heal The World – Wayne Wonder
6   One Day – Tony Rebel
7   Lionheart – Garnett Silk
8   Massa God World – Buju Banton
9   Outlaw – Terry Ganzie
10  Coppershot – Bounty Killer
11  Tempo – Anthony Red Rose
12  Family Man – Everton Blender
13  Complaint – Garnett Silk featuring Capleton
14  Greedy For More – Merciless
15  Whop Dem – Turbo Belly
16  Put Down The Weapon – Yami Bolo featuring Capleton
17  Watch What You Eat – Anthony B
18  Ready Fi Kill Sound – Shooks
19  Jah Works – Terror Fabulous
20  I Believe I Can Fly – Sanchez
21  Let It Flow – Singing Melody
22  Love Sponge – Buju Banton
23  No Looking Back – Uton Green
24  Oh Jah – Lebanculah And Sugar Black
25  The Right Path – Aaron Silk
26  Ghetto People Song – Everton Blender
27  If Jah – Tony Rebel
28  Are You Satisfied – Ras Shiloh
29  Crazy Baldheads – Luciano featuring Beenie Man
30  Time – Benji Mayaz
31  Won’t Last A Day – Sanchez
32  She’s Coming Back – Pinchers
33  When Will I See You Again – Pinchers
34  Dreams And Illusions – Pinchers
35  Nana’s Medley – Nana McClean
36  All That You Can Say – Sanchez
37  Sweat – Inner Circle
38  Samfied Girl – Leroy Gibbons
39  Tickle Her Fancy – Galaxy P
40  It Can’t Work – Tony Rebel
41  Gave You Everything I’ve Got – Garnett Silk
42  I Wish – Beres Hammond

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Big Bands of Reggae

Highlanda.net:

“Nothing compares to being in a venue where a reggae band is performing live.  The rumble of the bass lines surround you in a warm embrace and you can’t help but to rock and skank as you are transported to another realm and higher level of consciousness.  This describes the effects of the power that live reggae musicians have over the masses.”


Third World

Third World is a Grammy nominated Jamaican reggae band formed in 1973. Their sound is influenced by soul, funk and disco. Third World’s greatest success came in the late 1970s and early 1980s, peaking with their cover version of The O’Jays’ “Now That We Found Love”, a hit single on both sides of the Atlantic in 1979. Here is a Third World performing “Now That We Found Love:”
This song brought them to the attention of Stevie Wonder, who worked with them and wrote (along with Melody A. McCully) their song “Try Jah Love.” This band still records and tours to this day so definitely check them out if they come to a venue near you. Visit Third World online at http://www.thirdworldband.com/

Inner Circle

This Jamaican reggae group was formed in 1968 by the brothers Ian and Roger Lewis in Jamaica. The band released its debut album in 1974 on the famed record label, Trojan Records, and resigned in 1979 to Island Records, where the internationally successful album Everything Is Great originated. They are responsible for the 1989 song “Bad Boys,” which serves as the theme song for Fox Network’s long-running television program COPS. Here is Inner Circle with “Bad Boys:”
Jacob Miller, the frontman and lead singer, was killed in a car crash on March 23, 1980. The band appeared in the reggae cult film Rockers in 1978. Their second American hit, reaching #16 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1993 was “Sweat (A La La La La Long)”, which was a #3 hit in the UK. Here is Inner Circle with “Sweat:”

Steel Pulse
Steven Huey reports, “Generally a protest-minded Rastafarian outfit, Steel Pulse started out playing authentic roots reggae with touches of jazz and Latin music, and earned a substantial audience among white U.K. punks as well. Their 1978 debut, Handsworth Revolution, is still regarded by many critics as a landmark and a high point of British reggae. As the ’80s wore on, slick synthesizers and elements of dance and urban R&B gradually crept into their sound, even as their subject matter stayed on the militant side. By the late ’80s, Steel Pulse had won a Grammy and were working full-fledged crossover territory, but never reached the same degree of commercial acceptance as Aswad or Inner Circle. They subsequently returned to a tough-minded, rootsy sound that nonetheless made concessions to contemporary trends with touches of dancehall and hip-hop.” Here is Steel Pulse performing “Rally Round:”
In 1993 they performed at Bill Clinton’s inaugural celebration, the first reggae band to appear at such an event. Visit Steel Pulse’s website for more.

Aswad
From Vh1: “Aswad was arguably Britain’s most successful reggae band, in terms of both popularity and longevity. Critical opinion on their body of work is often divided; some hail their early material as the greatest roots reggae Britain ever produced, while others find their later pop-crossover phase more distinctive and unique, even at the expense of authenticity. Regardless, Aswad’s ability to adapt themselves to the changing times — new musical trends, shifting personnel — was ultimately the driving force behind their decades-long career.”
Aswad was often hired as backing musicians for touring Jamaican stars: Bob Marley, Burning Spear, Dennis Brown, and Black Uhuru.