Joe Gibbs Mix | Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 99

The producer Joe Gibbs, hardcore Jamaican entrepreneur, engineer, and record producer started recording artists in the back of his electronics repair shop in 1966.

joe gibbs mix

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He worked with Lee “Scratch” Perry who had left the employ of Coxsone Dodd‘s Studio One. Bunny Lee helped them form The Amalgamated record label. Soon ‘Niney The Observer‘ joined the team and they were able to produce Rocksteady era hits.

In 1972, Errol Thompson came on board as the chief engineer and together with Joe Gibbs formed “The Mighty Two.” Their studio band called The Professionals featured bassist Sly Dunbar, drummer Robbie Shakespeare, and guitarist Earl “Chinna” Smith.

Hundreds of hits came out including “Money in My Pocket” by Dennis Brown and “A So We Stay” by Big Youth. In 1977 the Culture album entitled “Two Sevens Clash” debuted and became a smash hit which coincided with the punk rock craze in the UK. 

Artists recorded and produced by Joe Gibbs included Dennis Brown, Jacob Miller, Gregory Isaacs, Junior Byles, Barrington Levy, Cornell Campbell, Delroy Wilson, Beres Hammond, JC Lodge, Marcia Aitken, Althea and Donna, Ranking Joe and Peter Tosh. The list goes on and on.

In the new millennium, Joe Gibbs focused on marketing his back catalog.  Joe Gibbs passed on to Zion in February 2008.  He had over 100 Jamaica number one hits and over a dozen UK hits.

He released music on an array of different record labels. An amazing body of work, the Joe Gibbs catalog includes some very important songs in the story of Jamaican music.  Salute to the icon, the giant, one of the greatest producers ever – Joe Gibbs. 

Please subscribe to the reggae lover podcast. Please share and invite others to listen. Email your requests and feedback to reggaeloverpodcast@gmail.com.   Until next time, keep it positive. This is Kahlil Wonda from Highlanda Sound saying Jah bless.

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Essential Reggae Riddims that Originated at Studio One

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studio1_Sir Coxsone Dodd‘s legacy is large and in charge here at the Reggae Lover Podcast. This episode was created to feed the demand for more Studio 1 sounds. Listen for remakes of foundation riddims like Far East, Boops, Entertainment, Love Bump, and more.

Playlist:

1 Wayne Wonder – Can’t Test Highlanda (dub plate)
2 Lady Ann – Informer
3 Yami Bolo – The Father Vex And Strike Back
4 Robert French – Meet Me By The River
5 Icho Candy – Selassie I
6 Tristan Palmer – Entertainment
7 Amazin Papa G (R.B.I Crew) – Miss Good Looking (dub plate)
8 White Mice – True Love
9 Andrew Bell – Listen To The Words (dubplate)
10 Mikey Melody – Highlanda A Big Bad Sound (dubplate)
11 Johnny Slaughter – Confusion
12 Gregory Isaacs – Lead Me
13 Cocoa TeaRikers Island
14 Sanchez featuring Bounty Killer – Searching
15 J.C. Lodge – Love Rewind
16 Maxi Priest – Bonafied Love
17 Sanchez – Rearrange My Live
18 Gregory Isaacs – Greedy For You Love
19 Singing Melody featuring Mad Cobra – Your Wish
20 Busy Signal – Dem Nuh Care
21 Busy Signal – Dat Me Love
22 Romain Virgo – Live Mi Life

The Ladies at Joe Gibbs

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The legendary productions of Joe Gibbs have generated many of the reggae genre’s biggest hits. The producer/label operated predominately between 1972 and 1984.

The legendary productions of Joe Gibbs have generated many of the reggae genre's biggest hits. The producer/label operated predominately between 1972 and 1984.The Ladies at Joe Gibbs brings together the classic hits from the female artists Gibbs recorded. The songs and riddims are most familiar and underscore why Joe Gibbs productions were at the top of the genre during these prime years. Judy Mowatt and June 'JC' Lodge went on to have major careers in reggae while other names have faded. Some of the re-mastered tracks include previously unreleased extended mixes. Featured tracks include Marcia Aitken "My Man' and 'I'm Still In Love With You' (which scored # 1 Pop in England), June 'JC' Lodge "Someone Loves You Honey" and a special extended version of Althea & Donna's classic rocker 'Uptown Top Ranking'.

The Ladies at Joe Gibbs brings together the classic hits from the female artists Gibbs recorded. The songs and riddims are most familiar and underscore why Joe Gibbs productions were at the top of the genre during these prime years.

Judy Mowatt and June ‘JC’ Lodge went on to have major careers in reggae while other names have faded. Some of the re-mastered tracks include previously unreleased extended mixes.

Featured tracks include Marcia Aitken “My Man’ and ‘I’m Still In Love With You‘ (which scored # 1 Pop in England), June ‘JC’ Lodge “Someone Loves You Honey” and a special extended version of Althea & Donna‘s classic rocker ‘Uptown Top Ranking‘.

 

Kemar ‘Flava’ McGregor Releases “80s Rock Riddim” on iTunes

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Kemar ‘Flava’ McGregor premiered his new riddim album, “80s Rock Riddim,” Tuesday, January 8, 2013 on iTunes, representing the first of an upcoming series of 1980s-styled pop-reggae projects.

The riddim album – which features new tracks from Gappy Ranks, Gyptian, Aaron Silk and JC Lodge – combines musical motifs from Brit-pop, R&B, soul and 1980’s dancehall, to create a distinctive mixture of melodic pop with a propulsive one-drop bass groove.

Kemar 'Flava' McGregor Releases "80s Rock Riddim" on iTunes

Kemar ‘Flava’ McGregor Releases “80s Rock Riddim” on iTunes

In early 2012, McGregor departed from the reggae mainstream, and began producing pop-reggae tracks for the corporate licensing market, which enlists a higher percentage of uplifting 1980s-era tracks that remind listeners of reggae’s bygone golden era.

With “80s Rock Riddim,” McGregor wanted to repair a longstanding credibility problem within the modern reggae industry – an industry that erroneously insists on producing music with negative lyrics and depressing musical styles that reggae fans never wanted, and often at the expense of melodic, party reggae, which has always attracted more customers globally than the negative-themed music of the reggae mainstream.

The concept of ‘80s Rock’ is to try to bring people back to the good old days of vocal reggae,” said McGregor. “The 1980s was where reggae got its fame and popularity. There’s a joy that I get from listening to ‘80s music – it makes you feel like living is worthwhile. And it’s not just reggae, it’s a lot of the ‘80s music. There’s also some good R&B that makes you feel that way.”

McGregor said “80s Rock Riddim” was inspired in large part by the great riddims of the 1980s, including “Far East” (Barry Brown’s version from 1986), “Sleng Teng” (1985), and popular albums “Big Ship,” by Freddie McGregor (1982), and “Rub-A-Dub Style,” by Michigan & Smiley (1980).

From McGregor’s point of view, these styles established reggae music as a universal worldwide party idiom, which would guarantee celebratory vibes regardless of where the music was played.

Apparently, today’s reggae scene has lost this celebratory spirit, McGregor said.

When I used to watch videotapes from the 1980s, I would see all those people dancing – the couples were slow-wining so tight, that not even the breeze could get through them,” McGregor said. “Today, when I go to a party, the ladies will be standing on the left side of the room, and the men will be standing on the right. The men will be screwing their faces, and the women will be standing with their arms crossed. That’s not the way to party.”

When I look at a dance floor today, I’ll hear a bunch of noise coming from the speakers, and when I look at the dance floor, I’ll expect to see a man and a woman dancing, but instead I’ll see a group of men dancing in the middle of the floor by themselves. I don’t want to see that.”

To illustrate his love for 1980s music, McGregor recorded a mixture of melodic songs from the most active artists in the new reggae industry, including Aaron Silk, Junior Kelly, Gappy Ranks, Adele Harley and Ammoye, along with a cadre of vocal legends from the 2000-decade mixtape era, such as Norris Man, Gyptian, Jah Mali and Tony Anthony. In addition, “80s Rock Riddim” will contain songs from “America’s Got Talent” finalist Cas Haley, and British reggae luminaries JC Lodge, Carroll Thompson and Don Campbell.

McGregor’s ultimate goal is to send a message that reggae’s survival will require producers to satisfy the demands of real customers, instead of using drug money to promote negative-themed music that no one wants to buy. McGregor said sales statistics already indicate that consumers prefer the sound of the 1980s.

Overall, I would say the music of the 1980s was more uplifting. There was more joy into it,” McGregor said. “Most of what the artists were saying in their lyrics – whether it was lovers rock, roots or rub-a-dub – you were excited about what was taking place. The stuff they were singing about, like Yellowman and Michigan & Smiley, it would make you want go out and have a good time. That’s why I like the ‘80s music. It has a lot of value to it.”

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