40 Amazing Dub Songs from the Masters

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This is an essential mix and overview of Dub, a Jamaican genre or sub-genre that grew out of Reggae music in the 1960s and has extended way beyond the scope of Reggae to inspire other genres including dubstep, hip-hop, jungle, grime, rock, house, techno, drum and bass, trip-hop, garage, and more.

artwork: Reggae Lover Podcast 120, Dub Music mix

Click to download: Dub Music Podcast

Dub was pioneered by Osbourne “KING TUBBY” Ruddock (pictured above), Lee “Scratch” Perry, and Augustus Pablo among others. Hear this specially curated mix now on the Reggae Lover Podcast, episode 120.

IHEARTRADIO: LISTEN AND FOLLOW HERE.

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Don Carlos Mix | Reggae Lover Podcast # 113

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This Reggae Lover episode features the legendary reggae singer known as Don Carlos.

Jamaican reggae singer and composer Don Carlos began singing in 1973 as a member of Black Uhuru. Don continues to perform sweet roots reggae music all over the world. Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 113

To Download Podcast – Click Image Above

Don Carlos was born Euvin Spencer in the Western Kingston district known as Waterhouse. If you didn’t know, this is one of the roughest parts of Kingston. I was also the birthplace of the group Black Uhuru, and super producers King Tubby and King Jammy.

Notice the consistency of the roots reggae sound and distinct vocal delivery in all the songs. Don Carlos began his career in 1973 as an original member of Black Uhuru along with Garth Ennis and Duckie Simpson. After a few years, the trio split and Don Carlos launched into a solo career.

In 1981 he dropped “Suffering,” an album that exploded on the scene becoming popular especially in Africa. Don Carlos was then solidified as a soloist. During the years between 80 and 85, he was also very popular on the Dancehall scene with many top 10 hits. Songs heard on this mix include the Volcano label hits, Hog and Goat, I’m Not Going Crazy, and Laser Beam.

Don continued releasing albums and touring throughout the 80s. Black Uhuru’s original members reunited from 1989-1994 before splitting again. Since then, Don Carlos has been one of the busiest touring artists out of Jamaica. He rocked the stage at Reggae on the River in California this summer. He has performed at the Sierra Nevada World Music Festival and other major festivals globally.

He will be on tour in 2019 to support a new album called Golden Classics. You can check him out at DonCarlosReggae.Com or coming to a stage near you.

IHEARTRADIO: LISTEN AND FOLLOW HERE.

STITCHER RADIO: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN HERE.

GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN HERE.

TUNE IN RADIO: FAVORITE AND LISTEN HERE.

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King Jammys Tribute (1st Volume) | Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 78

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We salute our dancehall trailblazer, king of digital reggae, sound system owner/producer Lloyd James aka KING JAMMY. This is the first half of a megamix featuring some big tunes and riddims from the Jammys catalog.

78 - Reggae Lover Podcast - King Jammys Tribute (1st Volume)

78 – Reggae Lover Podcast – King Jammys Tribute (1st Volume)

SOUNDCLOUD: CLICK TO DOWNLOAD OR PLAY EPISODE.

APPLE PODCAST: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN VIA  ITUNES.

GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN HERE.

TUNE IN RADIO: FAVORITE AND LISTEN HERE.

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For more King Jammys vibes check out episode 4 (Sanchez, L.U.S.T and Friends – 80s Lovers Rock), episode 5 (Superstars Hit Parade 1987-1989 Tunes/Riddims), episode 10 (Dancehall Time Traveling Back to the 80s and 90s), episode 36 (Stalag meets Sleng Teng), episode 39 (A Late Eighties Reggae Dream 1979-1991).

Also see our tribute episodes featuring Cocoa Tea, Sanchez, Johnny Osbourne, Frankie Paul, and Josey Wales – artists who all recorded hits released on the Jammy’s label. Lots more to come… all dedicated to you, #reggaelover.

Johnny Osbourne, The Dancehall Godfather | Reggae Lover Podcast 72

Seen as one of the greatest Jamaican singers and talked about as a top sound system dubplate artist, Johnny Osbourne, the dancehall Godfather climbed to the top of the reggae mountain over 30 years ago and remains there today.

HIGHLANDA SOUND #Reggae 72 - Reggae Lover Podcast - Johnny Osbourne, The Dancehall Godfather In playlist: THE REGGAE LOVER PODCA

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#RocksteadyATL Live Audio featuring Anthony Malvo + Little Twitch; Jah Prince + Highlanda Sound

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The full audio from Rocksteady May 3rd 2015 featuring Jah Prince is available for download via my soundcloud page.

1st Sundays Rocksteady ATL image: Anthony Malvo, Kahlil Wonda, and Little Twitch

Anthony Malvo, Kahlil Wonda, and Little Twitch

On Sunday May 3rd at the Sound Table, I had the great pleasure of hosting another installment of Rocksteady, Atlanta’s only thriving roots reggae monthly event. Internationally renowned hit-making reggae singer Anthony Malvo and his lyrical dancehall deejay compadre Little Twitch of King Jammys Super Power Hi Fi and King Sturgrav Sound System fame made a live appearance, performing together for the first time in years! This was also the very first feature for Little Twitch in the ATL. malvo-twitch

The energetic audience was transported back in time by nostalgic selections drawn from resident DJ Passport and special guest DJ Jah Prince of the Sunsplash radio mix-show and Smokin’ Needles Records. The stage and tone was set for me to play a few more songs and then call in the artists who escalated things from there like the true veterans they are.

twitch2

This audio portion features Malvo and Twitch in combination as I spin the riddim tracks. It was a joyous occassion in which new listeners were given an authentic taste of what dancehall reggae has to offer since the 1980s, while veteran skankers were provided with a mouth-watering feast of vibes for their own consumption.