40 Amazing Dub Songs from the Masters

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This is an essential mix and overview of Dub, a Jamaican genre or sub-genre that grew out of Reggae music in the 1960s and has extended way beyond the scope of Reggae to inspire other genres including dubstep, hip-hop, jungle, grime, rock, house, techno, drum and bass, trip-hop, garage, and more.

artwork: Reggae Lover Podcast 120, Dub Music mix

Click to download: Dub Music Podcast

Dub was pioneered by Osbourne “KING TUBBY” Ruddock (pictured above), Lee “Scratch” Perry, and Augustus Pablo among others. Hear this specially curated mix now on the Reggae Lover Podcast, episode 120.

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Don Carlos Mix | Reggae Lover Podcast # 113

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This Reggae Lover episode features the legendary reggae singer known as Don Carlos.

Jamaican reggae singer and composer Don Carlos began singing in 1973 as a member of Black Uhuru. Don continues to perform sweet roots reggae music all over the world. Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 113

To Download Podcast – Click Image Above

Don Carlos was born Euvin Spencer in the Western Kingston district known as Waterhouse. If you didn’t know, this is one of the roughest parts of Kingston. I was also the birthplace of the group Black Uhuru, and super producers King Tubby and King Jammy.

Notice the consistency of the roots reggae sound and distinct vocal delivery in all the songs. Don Carlos began his career in 1973 as an original member of Black Uhuru along with Garth Ennis and Duckie Simpson. After a few years, the trio split and Don Carlos launched into a solo career.

In 1981 he dropped “Suffering,” an album that exploded on the scene becoming popular especially in Africa. Don Carlos was then solidified as a soloist. During the years between 80 and 85, he was also very popular on the Dancehall scene with many top 10 hits. Songs heard on this mix include the Volcano label hits, Hog and Goat, I’m Not Going Crazy, and Laser Beam.

Don continued releasing albums and touring throughout the 80s. Black Uhuru’s original members reunited from 1989-1994 before splitting again. Since then, Don Carlos has been one of the busiest touring artists out of Jamaica. He rocked the stage at Reggae on the River in California this summer. He has performed at the Sierra Nevada World Music Festival and other major festivals globally.

He will be on tour in 2019 to support a new album called Golden Classics. You can check him out at DonCarlosReggae.Com or coming to a stage near you.

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King Jammys Tribute (1st Volume) | Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 78

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We salute our dancehall trailblazer, king of digital reggae, sound system owner/producer Lloyd James aka KING JAMMY. This is the first half of a megamix featuring some big tunes and riddims from the Jammys catalog.

78 - Reggae Lover Podcast - King Jammys Tribute (1st Volume)

78 – Reggae Lover Podcast – King Jammys Tribute (1st Volume)

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For more King Jammys vibes check out episode 4 (Sanchez, L.U.S.T and Friends – 80s Lovers Rock), episode 5 (Superstars Hit Parade 1987-1989 Tunes/Riddims), episode 10 (Dancehall Time Traveling Back to the 80s and 90s), episode 36 (Stalag meets Sleng Teng), episode 39 (A Late Eighties Reggae Dream 1979-1991).

Also see our tribute episodes featuring Cocoa Tea, Sanchez, Johnny Osbourne, Frankie Paul, and Josey Wales – artists who all recorded hits released on the Jammy’s label. Lots more to come… all dedicated to you, #reggaelover.

Johnny Osbourne, The Dancehall Godfather | Reggae Lover Podcast 72

Seen as one of the greatest Jamaican singers and talked about as a top sound system dubplate artist, Johnny Osbourne, the dancehall Godfather climbed to the top of the reggae mountain over 30 years ago and remains there today.

HIGHLANDA SOUND #Reggae 72 - Reggae Lover Podcast - Johnny Osbourne, The Dancehall Godfather In playlist: THE REGGAE LOVER PODCA

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#RocksteadyATL Live Audio featuring Anthony Malvo + Little Twitch; Jah Prince + Highlanda Sound

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The full audio from Rocksteady May 3rd 2015 featuring Jah Prince is available for download via my soundcloud page.

1st Sundays Rocksteady ATL image: Anthony Malvo, Kahlil Wonda, and Little Twitch

Anthony Malvo, Kahlil Wonda, and Little Twitch

On Sunday May 3rd at the Sound Table, I had the great pleasure of hosting another installment of Rocksteady, Atlanta’s only thriving roots reggae monthly event. Internationally renowned hit-making reggae singer Anthony Malvo and his lyrical dancehall deejay compadre Little Twitch of King Jammys Super Power Hi Fi and King Sturgrav Sound System fame made a live appearance, performing together for the first time in years! This was also the very first feature for Little Twitch in the ATL. malvo-twitch

The energetic audience was transported back in time by nostalgic selections drawn from resident DJ Passport and special guest DJ Jah Prince of the Sunsplash radio mix-show and Smokin’ Needles Records. The stage and tone was set for me to play a few more songs and then call in the artists who escalated things from there like the true veterans they are.

twitch2

This audio portion features Malvo and Twitch in combination as I spin the riddim tracks. It was a joyous occassion in which new listeners were given an authentic taste of what dancehall reggae has to offer since the 1980s, while veteran skankers were provided with a mouth-watering feast of vibes for their own consumption.

Perhaps" by Anthony Malvo on Vimeo

Anthony Malvo and Little Twitch, a King Jammys Combination

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In this episode we feature the multi-talented singer and producer of many hits, Anthony Malvo, along with pioneering dancehall icon Little Twitch.

littletwitch

Little Twitch

Anthony Malvo began his singing career in the early 1980’s in Kingston Jamaica on the Legendary Black Star Sound System. Malvo later moved on to perform, and record with the Reggae Producer and label King Jammys during their prime.

Anthony Malvo

Anthony Malvo

It was on King Jammys Sound System that Anthony Malvo often teamed up with Little Twitch among others as they dominated the Jamaican dancehall scene for most of the 1980s with many jam packed sessions and sound clash victories.

Here is a sampling of the many hits performed by both artists. Anthony Malvo’s latest single “I’m Not the Only One” which was produced by Ed Robinson is also featured in the mix.

Please enjoy this episode and look out for Little Twitch and Anthony Malvo to appear in Atlanta for ROCKSTEADY at the Sound Table on Sunday May 3, 2015.

Playlist:

1 Anthony Malvo and Sizzla – Cyaan Draw Wi Out
2 Anthony Malvo and Capleton – One Day Rude Boy
3 Little Twitch – Spanish Fly
4 Little Twitch – Devil Send You Come
5 Sluggy Ranks and Little Twitch – Jah Is Guiding I
6 Little Twitch – Respect Due
7 Anthony Malvo – Bad Minded People
8 Anthony Malvo – All of Me
9 Anthony Malvo – Is It Love
10 Anthony Malvo – I’m Not The Only One
11 Anthony Malvo and Daddy Lizard – Greatest Gal Lover
12 Little Twitch – Py Py Love
13 Anthony Malvo and Tiger – Come Back To Me (Summer Love)
14 Little Twitch -Watch Your Friends
15 Anthony Malvo and Daddy Lizard – Take You To The Dance

Alborosie Meets King Jammy: Dub Of Thrones

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Alborosie Meets King Jammy - Dub Of Thrones - Artwork

Alborosie Meets King Jammy – Dub Of Thrones – Artwork

VP Records/ Greensleeves announced the April 2015 worldwide release of Alborosie Meets King Jammy- Dub Of Thrones, a historic pairing of one of Jamaica’s most pivotal dub legends King Jammy with the modern Italian-born dubmaster Alborosie. Mixed by Alborosie at his Shengen studio and King Jammy at his studio in the Waterhouse district of Kingston, this old-school meets new-school dub battle delivers an authentic dub reggae listening experience.

The album’s throwback style and packaging captures the 1980’s reggae era and includes a fully-illustrated package by Tony McDermott, one of the illustrators of that time and today. The mostly instrumental collection will be available on CD, limited edition vinyl LP and digitally.

Alborosie and King Jammy plan to tour in support of this release throughout the summer. Dates will be announced shortly.

The Dominance of King Jammy and Biltmore Era Riddims

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Reggae Lover Podcast 39The episode commences with the Sly and Robbie produced version of the Randy Newman song,

Reggae Lover Podcast 39B

The episode commences with the Sly and Robbie produced version of the Randy Newman song, “Baltimore” from 1979 sung by The Tamlins. Courtney Melody and Dennis Brown follow with big tunes on the Baltimore Riddim before the hit from mighty King Jammys catalog, Dennis Brown’s “The Exit.”

Wayne Fire’s “Sexy Body” (1991) and “Come Down” by Super Cat from 1988 on the Wild Apache label launch the mix into the late 1980s. Listen for a Kenneth Hoo Kim produced version of the Hypocrite riddim released in 1984, and then almost every song after that point involves producers Bobby Digital, Steely and Clevie, and/or King Jammys.

The highlight is the Duck aka Duck Dance riddim from 1988. This was a time when Jammy’s label usually had 10 out of the top 20 songs on Jamaica’s charts and Admiral Bailey was the dominant artist in dancehall and on stage shows.

Tracklist

1 The Tamlins – Baltimore
2 Courtney Melody – In The Streets
3 Dennis Brown – The More I Excel
4 Dennis Brown – The Exit
5 Wayne Fire – Sexy Body
6 Super Cat – Come Down
7 Wayne Smith – Karma Chameleon
8 Tony Tuff – Gone Clear
9 Don Angelo – Settlement
10 Earl Sixteen – Come A Long Way
11 Midnight Rider – Hypocrite
12 Pad Anthony – Rub A Dub A Play
13 Johnny Osbourne – Gentle Is The Sound
14 Derrick Parker – My Heart Is Gone
15 Singing Melody – Hurry Back Home
16 Shabba Ranks – Gal Yuh Good
17 Shabba Ranks – Pay Down Pon It
18 Little Twitch – Watch Your Friends Them
19 Anthony Malvo – Run For Your Life
20 Josey Wales – Stamp Out
21 Tiger – The Dam Thing
22 Ninja Man – More Reality
23 Admiral Bailey – Them Have Fe Wait
24 Papa San – Style and Fashion
25 Chaka Demus – Bad Bad Shaka
26 Flourgon – Bounce
27 Red Dragon – Duck Dance
28 Singing Melody and Johnny P – Say You Love Me Baby
29 Bunny General – Must Get Defeat
30 Johnny P – Sound A Sound
31 Cocoa Tea and Charlie Chaplin – Lets Give Thanks
32 John Mouse – Me A Me
33 Chevell Franklyn – No One In The World
34 Lady Venus – Best Friend A Gi You Bun
35 Clement Irie – Loving
36 Johnny P – Cut Up
37 Lady Patra – Gun Inna Panty
38 Ninja Man – Heartical Don

2 Bad Riddims: The Stalag versus The Sleng Teng

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stalag-sleng_teng

It’s brings me great pleasure to release this episode of the Reggae Lover Podcast which features two riddims that were suggested by my listeners: the Stalag version and the Sleng Teng rhythm. If you have ever been to a reggae dance or concert, you have definitely heard songs on one or both of these legendary riddim tracks which have had a dominating prominence in the dancehall for three decades.

I selected this 22 song playlist out of the hundreds of tunes that have been recorded over these versions. The mix is comprised mostly of the original cuts produced by Winston “Techniques” Riley and Lloyd ‘King Jammy’ James. Please submit playlist suggestions and feedback to ReggaeLoverPodcast@gmail.com.

In Jamaica, the Stalag version (or Stalag riddim) is a popular reggae rhythm, which came to prominence in the 1970s. It was originally written and performed as “Stalag 17” (named after the 1953 war film) by Ansell Collins, and released by Winston Riley‘s Techniques record label in 1973.

It was mainly used for dub instrumental versions, often b-sides of records. The rhythm also influenced early hip-hop, and can be discerned on Public Enemy’s hit ‘Don’t Believe the Hype’ as well as on Too Short’s Blowjob Betty.

Sleng Teng is the name given to the first fully computerized riddim in Jamaican music. The riddim, which was created by the collaboration between King Jammy and Wayne Smith, was titled “Under Mi Sleng Teng“. Wayne Smith found the computerized sound in Noel Davey’s keyboard, and together he and Davey arranged the riddim, slowed it down, matched it to Smith’s key, and rehearsed on it with lyrics inspired by Barrington Levy’s “Under Mi Sensi” and Yellowman’s “Under me fat ting”, before taking it to Jammy’s studio in late 1984. The riddim itself is apparently an attempt to recreate Eddie Cochran’s 1959 rockabilly song “Somethin’ Else.” It is a pattern found in the Casio MT-40 home keyboard.

After the riddim was brought to the studio and Jammy heard it, he then slowed it further and placed piano and a clap on it. Jammy recorded a number of other artists on the original backing track including Tenor Saw (with “Pumpkin Belly”), and Johnny Osbourne (with “Buddy Bye”). The tunes were first unleashed at a now legendary soundclash between Jammy’s own sound system and Black Scorpio at Waltham Park Road on February 23, 1985.

Stalag 17 Playlist

1 Frankie Paul – Don’t Worry Yourself – Volcano
2 General Echo – Arlene – Techniques
3 Admiral Tibett – Trouble To A Man – Techniques
4 Little Kirk – Whats Love Got To Do – Techniques
5 Yami Bolo – Take It Easy – Techniques
6 Cocoa Tea – We Do The Killing – Digital B
7 Super Beagle – Soundboy Dust Out – Techniques
8 Tenor Saw and Buju Banton – Ring The Alarm Quick – Techniques
9 Sister Nancy – Bam Bam – Techniques
10 Cutty Ranks – Rude Bwoy Game – Techniques
11 Nicodemus – Suzy Wong – Skengdon

Sleng Teng Playlist

1 Wayne Smith – Under Me Sleng Teng – Jammys
2 Tenor Saw – Pumpkin Belly – Jammys
3 Echo Minott – Original Fat Ting – Jammys
4 Buddy Bye – Johnny Osbourne – Jammys
5 Josey Wales – Cowboy Style – Jammys
6 Yelloman – Reggae Ambassador – Jammys
7 Tony Curtis – Weak – John John
8 Anthony Red Rose – Under Me Fat Ting – King Tubbys
9 John Wayne – Call The Police For Me – Jammys
10 Super Cat – Trash and Ready – Jammys
11 Frankie Paul – Cassandra – Steely and Clevie

Super Cat’s Career Highlighted in new mix

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 Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 22 – Super Cat takes Center Stage

Super Cat is a deejay who achieved widespread popularity during the late 1980s and early 1990s dancehall movement. His nickname,

Super Cat, Don Dada album artwork.

Super Cat is a deejay who achieved widespread popularity during the late 1980s and early 1990s dancehall movement. His nickname, “Wild Apache”, was given to him by his mentor Early B. He is the elder brother of reggae artist Junior Cat and is considered one of the greatest deejays within the Jamaican dance-hall scene to date.

This is not a commercial mix so if your’e listenting for the collaborations with Kriss Kross, Biggie Smalls, and 112 recorded after Cat was signed to Columbia Records, you are in the wrong place.

This mix goes back to the roots in the Cockburn Pen / Seaview Gardens section of Kingston, captures the style Super Cat brought live on stage performing with KillamanJaro Sound System, and tours through recordings produced by Steely & Clevie, King Jammy‘s, and his own Wild Apache Productions label.

About an hour in length, here is the #ReggaeLover tribute to Super Cat, a major figure in the positive-consciousness dancehall movement.