King Jammys Tribute (2nd Volume) | Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 79

By popular demand, we feature more classic dancehall hits from the legendary King Jammys catalog.

79 - Reggae Lover Podcast - King Jammys Tribute (2nd Volume)

79 – Reggae Lover Podcast – King Jammys Tribute (2nd Volume)

Imagine going to a dance and hearing a massive sound system playing.  The records you hear are brand new exclusives being debuted.  The ground shakes with the bass line.

Then the presentation climaxes.  The top recording artists in the land vocally accentuate your vibes with live freestyles over amazing instrumental music tracks.

This was the experience at a dancehall session in the 1980s with world-famous King Jammy‘s Sound System out of the Waterford section of Kingston, Jamaica.

The King Jammys Tribute (1st Volume) episode is definitely the most popular podcast episode of this series on iTunes and SoundCloud. A big thank you to everybody who’s been listening.

STITCHER RADIO: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN HERE.79 - Reggae Lover Podcast - King Jammys Tribute (2nd Volume)

 GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN HERE.GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN to reggae lover HERE.

TUNE IN RADIO: FAVORITE AND LISTEN HERE.TUNE IN RADIO: FAVORITE AND LISTEN to reggae lover HERE.

SOUNDCLOUD: CLICK TO DOWNLOAD OR PLAY EPISODE.SOUNDCLOUD: CLICK TO DOWNLOAD OR PLAY EPISODE 79 - Reggae Lover Podcast - King Jammys Tribute (2nd Volume)

 APPLE PODCAST: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN VIA  ITUNES.APPLE Music PODCAST: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN to Reggae Lover VIA ITUNES.

King Kong, Nitty Gritty, Half Pint and Tenor Saw: Featured Reggae Singers

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This was a listener requested mix consisting of the biggest tracks from 4 singers: King Kong, Half Pint, Tenor Saw and Nitty Gritty. Ray said he thought these artists sound alike and that called for a mix with their hits.

artwork forReggae Lover Podcast Episode 16 - King Kong, Nitty Gritty, Half Pint, Tenor Saw

Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 16 – King Kong, Nitty Gritty, Half Pint, Tenor Saw

Their voices are easily distinguishable to my ear, but I agree that Tenor Saw and Nitty Gritty sang with a very similar and unique style.  King Kong ended up copying that style of vocal delivery, but Half Pint carved out his own lane on the way to enormous success in the 1980s and 90s as a reggae crooner.

RIP to Nitty Gritty and Tenor Saw whose likes were cut down way too early. This is a dedication to you and every reggae lover.

Tracklist

1 Jah Jah Rule – King Kong
2 Message To All Beginners – Tenor Saw
3 Greetings – Half Pint
4 Roll Call – Tenor Saw
5 Lots of Sign – Tenor Saw
6 Run Come Call Me – Tenor Saw
7 Trouble Again – King Kong
8 Pumpkin Belly (Old Time Proverbs) – Tenor Saw
9 Run Down The World – Nitty Gritty
10 Mr. Landlord – Half Pint
11 One Big Family – Half Pint
12 Rub A Dub Market – Tenor Saw
13 Who Is Gonna Help Me Praise – Tenor Saw
14 Draw Mi Mark – Nitty Gritty
15 Soul Mate – Half Pint
16 Golden Hen – Tenor Saw
17 Champion Sound – King Kong
18 Ring The Alarm Quick – Tenor Saw / Buju Banton
19 False Alarm – Nitty Gritty
20 Good Morning Teacher – Nitty Gritty
21 Fever – Tenor Saw
22 Crazy Girl – Half Pint
23 Hog Inna Minty – Nitty Gritty
24 Zero Them Minds – Nitty Gritty
25 Substitute Lover – Half Pint
26 Shirley Jones – Tenor Saw
27 Winsome – Half Pint
28 We Run Things – Nitty Gritty
29 Where Is Your Culture – King Kong
30 No Work On Sunday – Tenor Saw
31 Stand Me Now – King Kong
32 Kill Dem Wid It – King Kong
33 My Sound Stands Alone – King Kong
34 Ready Done – Nitty Gritty

Cocoa Tea Confirmed for Bass Odyssey’s 25th Anniversary

Cocoa Tea, King Jammys, Stone Love, Renaissance, Sentinal, Metro Media, Bass Odyssey

Cocoa Tea, King Jammys, Stone Love, Renaissance, Sentinel, Metro Media, Bass Odyssey

Musical Tribute To Fallen Reggae Singer Sluggy Ranks

 

Our tribute to Sluggy Ranks from the August 1st, Emancipation Day edition of Reggae Vault Classics radio show recorded live at Daflavaradio.com.  The live show was produced by the original Highlanda Sound System.

 

Kahlil Wonda on ‘The Finest Years’ of Reggae Music

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The period beginning in the 1960’s on up through the 1980’s is what I refer to as The Finest Years of reggae music.  I sometimes include also the 1990’s.  The Finest Years includes many styles of the genre, from very grass-roots productions such as those of Studio One in Jamaica and Treasure Isle in the UK to the computerized creations of Jammy’s and Digital B in the 80’s and early 90’s.  These are some of my favorite selections as a consumer and Disc Jockey alike.  I pride myself as a collector and will never, ever, ever part with my musical treasure – original 12″, 10″, and 7″ records.

The Finest Years - classic reggae mix CD cover
The Finest Years – classic reggae mix CD cover

Click the Image to Download.

Although I don’t think its my very best mixing, this 100% vinyl mix is well selected and flows nicely from start to finish with some very nice transitions from song to song.  The sound quality is very good considering the age of some of the records being played, although I think the sound effects are sometimes too loud, especially for the type of songs being played.

The Finest Years - classic reggae mix CD cover
The Finest Years – classic reggae mix CD cover

The Finest Years mix begins with Ken Boothe’s ‘Everything I Own,’ which I use at the beginning to immediately set the tone. The first blend brings in Alton Ellis singing ‘I’m Just A Guy’ on the Studio One label. At this point you can really hear some hissing and popping from the needle travelling along the grooves of the original 45 (7″ record played at 45rpms). ‘Love and Devotion’ sung by Jimmy Riley (Tarrus Riley’s father for those who don’t know) is next followed by Eek A Mouse’s ‘Virgin Girl,’ a Volcano recording.

The mix steps up pace just a bit now as I draw for “I’m Still in Love” sung by Marcia Aitken and produced by the legendary Joe Gibbs. This tune was made popular recently by Sean Paul and Sasha. For all dub lovers I feature Studio One’s Ken Booth 45 of ‘When I Fall In Dub,’ (look for more dub featured on mixes coming soon). One good Studio One deserves another so another blend begins and The Heptones sing ‘Pretty Looks’ for us. Next is the first song from Dennis Emmanuel Brown, The Crown Prince of Reggae, ‘Sitting and Watching,’ followed by the Empress of Reggae, Marcia Griffiths with ‘Feel Like Jumping.’

The mix then goes into a vintage classic, ‘Loving Pauper,’ by Dobby Dobson. I remember drawing tunes like this in the early days of Highlanda to the surprise and praise of the elders in the community who asked “is how you know dem tune ya?” The Heptones’ ‘Sitting In the Park’ mixes in right on beat and ushers in more nostalgia before again the voice of Mr. D. Brown is featured with ‘Have You Ever.’ I had to let this one play for a while before transitioning smoothly into ‘I’ve Got The Handle,’ another Heptones Studio One classic, then Freddie McGregor’s version of ‘Let Him Try.’

The blend that follows is crucial as it brings across to your speakers the voices of Bob Andy and Marcia Griffiths with ‘Always Together,’ a lover’s anthem recorded at Studio One. I had to feature some Bob Marley so the next blend is into ‘Nice Time,’ original Tuff Gong 45 and from there back to Studio One with Alton Ellis ‘Breaking Up.’ To keep things interesting next up is ‘Can’t Stop Loving You’ by Freddie McGregor and ‘Missing You’ by Dennis Brown, (This Dennis Brown version was recorded at Don 1 studios in Brooklyn, New York) and Cocoa Tea‘s ‘Tune In’ on the Far East riddim. Volcano label 45 ‘Rocking Dolly‘ also by Cocoa Tea blends in smoothly next followed by another Cocoa Tea hit ‘She Loves Me Now.’

For many what follows is the sweetest part of The Finest Years mix. 6 Dennis Browns in a row blended masterfully starting with the Joe Gibbs dub version of ‘Money In My Pocket’ and moving into the original version, then ‘Silhoutte,’ ‘Take It Easy,’ ‘Caress Me Girl,’ ‘How Could I Leave,’ and ‘Rocking Time.’ Thank you D. Brown, we love you!

The next 4 songs are from Studio One: ‘Party Time’ by the Heptones, ‘Truly,’ by Marcia Griffiths, ‘Play Play Girl,’ by Johnny Osborne, and ‘Fatty Fatty,’ by Alton Ellis. Then an all-time favorite of mine ‘Friends for Life,’ is performed by Dennis Brown followed by The Melodians with ‘Come On Little Girl,’ and Cornell Campbell with ‘Boxing,’ another Joe Gibbs masterpiece. Featuring one more Freddie McGregor, the mix transitions into ‘I Was Born A Winner,’ and serious rockers tune ‘Keep On Knocking’ by Jacob Miller. The Finest Years closes out with Gregory Issacs‘s ‘Number One,’ and the classic ballad by Junior Byles, ‘Curley Lox.’

Thank you for reading and more importantly thank you for listening. The purpose of this blog post is for the education of those who seek to learn more about this powerful force, this divine gift of reggae.

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