40 Amazing Dub Songs from the Masters

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This is an essential mix and overview of Dub, a Jamaican genre or sub-genre that grew out of Reggae music in the 1960s and has extended way beyond the scope of Reggae to inspire other genres including dubstep, hip-hop, jungle, grime, rock, house, techno, drum and bass, trip-hop, garage, and more.

artwork: Reggae Lover Podcast 120, Dub Music mix

Click to download: Dub Music Podcast

Dub was pioneered by Osbourne “KING TUBBY” Ruddock (pictured above), Lee “Scratch” Perry, and Augustus Pablo among others. Hear this specially curated mix now on the Reggae Lover Podcast, episode 120.

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Joe Gibbs Mix | Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 99

The producer Joe Gibbs, hardcore Jamaican entrepreneur, engineer, and record producer started recording artists in the back of his electronics repair shop in 1966.

joe gibbs mix

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He worked with Lee “Scratch” Perry who had left the employ of Coxsone Dodd‘s Studio One. Bunny Lee helped them form The Amalgamated record label. Soon ‘Niney The Observer‘ joined the team and they were able to produce Rocksteady era hits.

In 1972, Errol Thompson came on board as the chief engineer and together with Joe Gibbs formed “The Mighty Two.” Their studio band called The Professionals featured bassist Sly Dunbar, drummer Robbie Shakespeare, and guitarist Earl “Chinna” Smith.

Hundreds of hits came out including “Money in My Pocket” by Dennis Brown and “A So We Stay” by Big Youth. In 1977 the Culture album entitled “Two Sevens Clash” debuted and became a smash hit which coincided with the punk rock craze in the UK. 

Artists recorded and produced by Joe Gibbs included Dennis Brown, Jacob Miller, Gregory Isaacs, Junior Byles, Barrington Levy, Cornell Campbell, Delroy Wilson, Beres Hammond, JC Lodge, Marcia Aitken, Althea and Donna, Ranking Joe and Peter Tosh. The list goes on and on.

In the new millennium, Joe Gibbs focused on marketing his back catalog.  Joe Gibbs passed on to Zion in February 2008.  He had over 100 Jamaica number one hits and over a dozen UK hits.

He released music on an array of different record labels. An amazing body of work, the Joe Gibbs catalog includes some very important songs in the story of Jamaican music.  Salute to the icon, the giant, one of the greatest producers ever – Joe Gibbs. 

Please subscribe to the reggae lover podcast. Please share and invite others to listen. Email your requests and feedback to reggaeloverpodcast@gmail.com.   Until next time, keep it positive. This is Kahlil Wonda from Highlanda Sound saying Jah bless.

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Bulby York - Renowned live & studio engineer, producer from Kingston Jamaica. Cyndi Lauper, Chaka Khan, Shabba Ranks, Jimmy Cliff, Rihanna, Britney Spears, Madonna, Michael Franti, UB40, Sinead 'O Connor, Sly&Robbie...

How to make a strong career as a music producer/engineer

Producer and engineer Bulby York rallies Jamaican superstars – Beres Hammond, Bounty Killer, Agent Sasco (Assassin), Lee “Scratch” Perry, Jesse Royal, Maxi Priest, Cherine, Sizzla, Busy Signal, Lutan Fyah and more – for his debut album “Epic & Ting,” released May 13, 2016 on VP Records.

Epic & Ting Album Cover

Epic & Ting Album Cover

Bulby’s sound spans multiple genres – merging reggae, dancehall, dub and EDM into a style of his own. The project has consistently been receiving spins on BBC Radio 1, BBC 1Xtra, Capital XTRA & much more!

As one of Jamaica’s most in-demand studio men, the Kingston-born producer has put his touch on signature dancehall records by Sean Paul, Bounty Killer and Beenie Man and also worked with the who’s who of pop music, including No Doubt, Rihanna, Britney Spears and Madonna. After years of bringing other people’s projects to life, Bulby now has a masterpiece he can call his own in Epic & Ting.

Download “Epic & Ting”: http://smarturl.it/EpicAndTing

Kahlil Wonda and Reggae Lover present Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry

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Lee 'Scratch' PerryWelcome to Episode 20 of the Reggae Lover Podcast, my first “dubwise” edition. This mix was specially requested by Ras Jamal in Savannah, Georgia and features the musical productions and performances of Lee “Scratch” Perry exclusively.  

One of the pioneers in the development of dub music and remixing in addition to numerous other innovations in production, Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry truly paved the way for the EDM, Hip-Hop, and Reggae movements of today.  Learn more about Perry’s amazing career.  

Show Notes.

We start off in the 60 – 70 BPM range with The Upsetters‘ Curly Dub and move into a couple different dub versions of Satisfy My Soul featuring Bob Marley and The Wailers.  The Upsetters’ Super Ape is up next, leading into a “Vibrate On” medley.  Augustus Pablo, Max Romeo, Hugo Blackwood and Dr. Alimantado are featured on the riddim alongside Perry and The Upsetters.  A cool blend transitions from there into Bob Marley dub once again with “Live,” a Lively Up Yourself dub version and then a Screw Face dub version entitled “Face Man.”

Junior Murvin can then be heard singing “Roots Train,” followed by his massive hit tune “Police And Thieves.”  I selected 3 tracks from Perry’s “Arkology” box set on the same riddim.  The voices of Glen DaCosta and Jah Lion are featured in this set along with some wicked Saxophone and the masterful instrumentation of Lee Perry dubbing out on the board.

For the next few tracks I go into the Jungle Dub album, my favorite album of Perry’s work.  The very heavy-weight Super Ape album, Ras Jamal’s highest rated Scratch Perry album is also a focal point of this mix.  Other noteable selections served up are “Bad Walking” with Tommy McCook and “I Chase The Devil/Croaking Lizard” with Max Romeo and Prince Jazzbo.

Please email me (reggaeloverpodcast@gmail.com) if you want the full tracklist. My wish is that listeners will hear this mix and go looking for Lee Perry’s music to purchase.  Dub music should be a part of every reggae lover’s music collection.

Reggae reissue label Blood and Fire resurrected via VP alliance

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US-based reggae label VP Records is resurrecting former British reggae independent Blood And Fire, with the indie’s former A&R chief Steve Barrow on board to run it.

Blood and Fire Logo

VP Records Relaunches Classic Reggae Label Blood and Fire

Blood and Fire was known primarily for its quality reissues of Jamaican recordings from the 1970s and ’80s, many of which were overlooked upon their initial release.

photo: Gregory Isaacs release on Blood and Fire label

The initial VP/Blood and Fire collaboration will be a (vinyl only) limited edition 12″ of Gregory Isaacs’ 1978 single “Mr. Know It All,” scheduled for release on Record Store Day (Apr. 19).

 

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JOE GIBBS, LEGENDARY REGGAE PRODUCER FEATURED on REGGAE VAULT CLASSICS

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Label owner and hit record producer Joe Gibbs's productions featured in a mix with narration by Kahlil Wonda for Da Music Vault radio show.

Label owner and hit record producer Joe Gibbs’s productions featured in a mix with narration by Kahlil Wonda for Da Music Vault radio show.

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Stephen Marley: Reggae, Guitars and His Father’s Legacy

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“There’s a simple explanation,” says Stephen Marley, with a laugh. “It’s called DNA.”

Just about everyone agrees: of all the children of Bob Marley, Stephen received the lion’s share of his father’s musical genes. As the family’s “go-to” producer, the 36-year-old has earned a slew of Grammys for his work through the years. More than that, however, Marley simply sounds like his father. As evidenced on Mind Control, his 2007 debut album, his voice bears an uncanny resemblance to that of reggae’s greatest practitioner.

All that said, however, Marley has proved adept at pushing the boundaries of traditional reggae. On the pioneering 1999 reggae/hip-hop fusion album Chant Down Babylon, and on his brother Damian’s Grammy-winning Welcome to Jamrock, the producer-songwriter wove a mix of contemporary styles into reggae’s solid foundation. And even on Mind Control, on trip-hop flavored tracks like “Hey Baby” and “Traffic Jam,” he sometimes sounds like a modern-day equivalent of madman reggae pioneer Lee Perry.

Just as important, Marley seems to have inherited his father’s formidable work ethic. In the midst of a mini-tour, and with several projects in progress, he spoke with us about his music, his guitars, and why he likes country-western songs.

How did you become the go-to guy for most of the family’s projects? Does it have more to do with your personality, or with your musical versatility?

It’s more about my personality. I’m the member of the family who was born in April. In the Bible, April is from the tribe of Reubin. Reubin was the first son of Jacob. That type of personality — being a leader, a big brother — is part of me.

Which do you enjoy more working on a project of your own, or working on someone else’s project, where you’re sort of behind the curtain?

It’s hard to say. Everything we do is done the same way. Obviously there are small differences, but with the Mind Control project, for example, Damian and Julian were there with me. Nothing changes, really, in our approach.

Is it different working with members of your family, as opposed to working with people with whom you aren’t related?

It is different. There’s more of a bond in the conception, with family. Everyone kind of thinks on the same wavelength. Working with people outside the family involves communication that has to be sort of broken down.

Looking back, the Chant Down Babylon album, where you incorporated hip-hop into your father’s songs, seems especially significant. Did you have reservations about doing that?

Yes. We were very cautious, but the relevance of that record was very important. The way it came together, it was clear it was meant to be. For example, we were in the studio talking about Erykah Badu (http://www.erykahbadu.com/), and she just happened to come to tour the Bob Marley Museum at the same time. I said, “You know, we were just talking about you.” I told her about the project and she came on-board. It was effortless.

Do you think your father would have been a fan of hip-hop?

Yes, mon. He was a big fan of dancehall music. He liked Big Youth and Dillinger — those types of artists.

People might be surprised to learn that you’re a big fan of country-western music.

Yeah, very much. Country music reminds me a lot of Jamaican folks who live in the country. Music with just an acoustic guitar, or a banjo, has that folk style, where most of the songs tell stories. A lot of Jamaicans love country music. Back in the ’70s and early ’80s there was a lot of country music there — Kenny Rogers and so forth.

When you begin work on a song, which of your guitars do you usually pick up?

It’s usually an acoustic guitar, usually an Ovation. But on-stage I play a Gibson, a Les Paul Custom. And now I have my first Gibson acoustic. It’s a beautiful guitar. I’ve been playing it a lot while I’ve been out on the road — getting to know her, so to speak. I’ve been writing on the Gibson acoustic a bit as well.

Your father also played Les Pauls. Do you still have his guitars?
Yes, the family has them. He used to call his main Les Paul “Old Faithful.” He would tell us children, “Go and bring ‘Old Faithful’ to me.”

Do you ever use his guitars in the studio?

Sometimes.

Your father had an incredibly strong work ethic, which is something you seem to have inherited.

We inherited the lessons from that, in the sense of knowing what a strong work ethic brings. After that, it’s up to you, whether you want to work hard or not. Seeing the results of my father’s hard work — what that hard work brought — is the best lesson we learned. If we want similar results, then we too have to work hard too.

His legacy has never seemed burdensome to you. Instead, you’ve always seemed to cherish the responsibility that goes along with that.

That’s true. That responsibility makes you a better person. It keeps you in line, and helps you in life. It helps you in life because his example is so positive.

Source: Gibson.com

 

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