Diseases Riddim Hits Mix | Reggae Lover Episode 66

diseases riddim reggae lover artwork

Diseases Riddim Mix | Reggae Lover by Highlanda Sound | Episode 66

The Diseases riddim, which is sometimes referred to or known as the Golden Hen riddim is featured here.

I call it the Worries in the Dance Riddim, but the original version of the instrumental was used for the song entitled “Mad Mad Mad” produced in the 1960s by Coxsone Dodd for his Studio One label featuring Alton Ellis on the main vocals. Therefore the original name of this riddim is Mad Mad Mad.

This mix starts with Mad Mad Mad by Alton Ellis and goes all the way to Sizzla in the end. Thank you for listening to the #ReggaeLoverPodcast

PLAYLIST:

  1. Alton Ellis – Mad Mad Mad
  2. Louie Lepke – Jamaica On My Mind
  3. Stevie Face – Can’t Go Round It
  4. Dennis Brown – Coming Home Tonight
  5. Don Carlos – I’m Not Crazy
  6. Linval ThompsonLook How Me Sexy
  7. Frankie Paul – Sindie
  8. Frankie Paul – Worries In The Dance
  9. Sister Nancy – Ain’t no Stopping Nancy Now
  10. Anthony B – Fire Bun Now
  11. Yellowman – I’m Getting Married
  12. Yellowman – I’m Getting Divorced
  13. Toyan – Barry G
  14. Sister Nancy – Coward of the Country
  15. Michael Palmer – Lick Shot
  16. Half Pint – Soul Mate
  17. Tenor Saw – Golden Hen
  18. Shinehead – Rough and Rugged
  19. Cocoa Tea – I’ve Lost My Sonia
  20. Michigan and Smiley – Diseases
  21. Josey Wales – Leggo Me Hand Gateman
  22. Iba Mahr – Set Away
  23. Bugle – Same Game
  24. Sizzla – Sekkle Dung

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Original Dancehall Style: DJs from the days of Studio One

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Reggae Lover Podcast 43 artwork

Reggae Lover Podcast 43 artwork

Hear some essential works from the 60s and 70s by the predecessors of rappers and today’s dancehall artists. Who was the first DJ (dancehall deejay)? This is often debated and I’m not going to get into the argument, but I personally credit U-Roy as the DJ daddy.

If Daddy U-Roy wasn’t the 1st, then he certainly had the earliest and largest impact with toasting (rapping) over previously recorded instrumentals in the live dancehall setting. Coxsone Dodd, among many other innovations to his credit, pioneered the recording and production of DJs at Studio One.

This mix merely touches upon some of this important dancehall history and I intend to thoroughly exhibit more of the talented foundation artists in future episodes of the Reggae Lover Podcast.

There are too many DJs to name who rose to prominence by delivering rhymes over beats on the Jamaican music scene long before The Sugar Hill Gang‘s ‘Rapper’s Delight‘ was released in 1979 as the first ever rap record.

Playlist

1 Junior Byles – Beat Down Babylon
2 Lyricson and Dennis Alcapone – Alpha and Omega
3 Cuture – Zion Gate
4 Prince Mohammed – 40 Leg Dread
5 Johnny Osborne – Murderer
6 Lone Ranger – Keep On Coming A Dance
7 Mighty Diamonds – Pass the Kutchie
8 Charlie Chaplin – Bubbling Telephone
9 Carlton and The Shoes – Love Me Forever
10 Dennis Alcapone – Forever Version
11 Dennis Brown – Money In My Pocket
12 Big Youth – Ah So We Stay
13 Barrington Levy – Mine Your Mouth
14 Louie Lepke – Late Night Movie
15 Alexander Henry – Please Be True
16 Johnny Osborne – Sing Jay Stylee
17 Big Youth – Dread Is Best
18 Delroy Wilson – Never Conqueror (Cousins version)
19 Dennis Alcapone – The Conqueror (Studio One version)
20 Dennis Brown – How Could I Leave
21 Prince Mohammed – Bubbling Love
22 The Heptones – Pretty Looks
23 Michigan and Smiley – Compliment To Studio One
24 Larry Marshall – Throw Me Corn
25 Rude Boyz International – Bring Back The Loving (dub plate)
26 The Techniques – Queen Majesty
27 U-Roy – Chalice In the Palace
28 Gregory Isaacs and U-Roy – Love Is Overdue
29 Jacob Miller and U Brown – Keep On Knocking
30 Freddie McGregor – Bobby Babylon
31 Lone Ranger – No Call Me Cracky
32 Dennis Brown – Sitting and Watching
33 Ranking Dread – Lots of Loving
34 Willie Williams – Armageddon Time
35 Michigan and Smiley – Nice Up the Dance
36 Slim Smith – Never Let Go
37 Lone Ranger – The Answer
38 Horace Andy – Fever
39 Jim Brown – Cure Fi the Fever

Kemar ‘Flava’ McGregor Releases “80s Rock Riddim” on iTunes

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Kemar ‘Flava’ McGregor premiered his new riddim album, “80s Rock Riddim,” Tuesday, January 8, 2013 on iTunes, representing the first of an upcoming series of 1980s-styled pop-reggae projects.

The riddim album – which features new tracks from Gappy Ranks, Gyptian, Aaron Silk and JC Lodge – combines musical motifs from Brit-pop, R&B, soul and 1980’s dancehall, to create a distinctive mixture of melodic pop with a propulsive one-drop bass groove.

Kemar 'Flava' McGregor Releases "80s Rock Riddim" on iTunes

Kemar ‘Flava’ McGregor Releases “80s Rock Riddim” on iTunes

In early 2012, McGregor departed from the reggae mainstream, and began producing pop-reggae tracks for the corporate licensing market, which enlists a higher percentage of uplifting 1980s-era tracks that remind listeners of reggae’s bygone golden era.

With “80s Rock Riddim,” McGregor wanted to repair a longstanding credibility problem within the modern reggae industry – an industry that erroneously insists on producing music with negative lyrics and depressing musical styles that reggae fans never wanted, and often at the expense of melodic, party reggae, which has always attracted more customers globally than the negative-themed music of the reggae mainstream.

The concept of ‘80s Rock’ is to try to bring people back to the good old days of vocal reggae,” said McGregor. “The 1980s was where reggae got its fame and popularity. There’s a joy that I get from listening to ‘80s music – it makes you feel like living is worthwhile. And it’s not just reggae, it’s a lot of the ‘80s music. There’s also some good R&B that makes you feel that way.”

McGregor said “80s Rock Riddim” was inspired in large part by the great riddims of the 1980s, including “Far East” (Barry Brown’s version from 1986), “Sleng Teng” (1985), and popular albums “Big Ship,” by Freddie McGregor (1982), and “Rub-A-Dub Style,” by Michigan & Smiley (1980).

From McGregor’s point of view, these styles established reggae music as a universal worldwide party idiom, which would guarantee celebratory vibes regardless of where the music was played.

Apparently, today’s reggae scene has lost this celebratory spirit, McGregor said.

When I used to watch videotapes from the 1980s, I would see all those people dancing – the couples were slow-wining so tight, that not even the breeze could get through them,” McGregor said. “Today, when I go to a party, the ladies will be standing on the left side of the room, and the men will be standing on the right. The men will be screwing their faces, and the women will be standing with their arms crossed. That’s not the way to party.”

When I look at a dance floor today, I’ll hear a bunch of noise coming from the speakers, and when I look at the dance floor, I’ll expect to see a man and a woman dancing, but instead I’ll see a group of men dancing in the middle of the floor by themselves. I don’t want to see that.”

To illustrate his love for 1980s music, McGregor recorded a mixture of melodic songs from the most active artists in the new reggae industry, including Aaron Silk, Junior Kelly, Gappy Ranks, Adele Harley and Ammoye, along with a cadre of vocal legends from the 2000-decade mixtape era, such as Norris Man, Gyptian, Jah Mali and Tony Anthony. In addition, “80s Rock Riddim” will contain songs from “America’s Got Talent” finalist Cas Haley, and British reggae luminaries JC Lodge, Carroll Thompson and Don Campbell.

McGregor’s ultimate goal is to send a message that reggae’s survival will require producers to satisfy the demands of real customers, instead of using drug money to promote negative-themed music that no one wants to buy. McGregor said sales statistics already indicate that consumers prefer the sound of the 1980s.

Overall, I would say the music of the 1980s was more uplifting. There was more joy into it,” McGregor said. “Most of what the artists were saying in their lyrics – whether it was lovers rock, roots or rub-a-dub – you were excited about what was taking place. The stuff they were singing about, like Yellowman and Michigan & Smiley, it would make you want go out and have a good time. That’s why I like the ‘80s music. It has a lot of value to it.”

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