The Top 5 Revolutionary Reggae Songs of All Time

We list our Top 5 Revolutionary Reggae Songs of all time. Ras Jamal from Royal Ethiopian Sound joins the discussion to give his analysis.


We define what a revolutionary song is and how the music of the 70s differs from the messages in today’s music. There are different kinds of revolutions. The conversation takes us through some responses that have emerged as a result of today’s struggle for racial justice.

Top 5 Revolutionary Reggae Songs with Ras Jamal from Royal Ethiopian Sound on Reggae Lover (podcast).


Anthony B, Sizzla, Jah9, Yeza, Kabaka Pyramid, Protoje, Akae Beka, Lutan Fyah, Warrior King, and Queen Ifrica are commended for their contributions to the movement. We each listed some honorable mentions in addition to our top 5 revolutionary reggae songs. Listen to the Pandora playlist inspired by this episode.


Kahlil Wonda’s Top 5 Revolutionary Reggae Songs

  • Bob Marley – Burning and Looting
  • Bob Marley – Revolution
  • Peter Tosh – Equal Rights
  • Sizzla – Made Of
  • Bob Marley – Slave Driver

AGARD’s Top 5 Revolutionary Reggae Songs

  • Bob Andy – Unchained
  • The Abyssinians – Declaration of Rights
  • Peter Tosh – Equal Rights
  • Dennis Brown – Revolution
  • Bob Marley – War

Ras Jamal’s Top 5 Revolutionary Reggae Songs

  • John Holt – Police In Helicopter
  • Bob Marley – War
  • Peter Tosh – Equal Rights
  • Dennis Brown – Revolution
  • Beres Hammond – Another Day In The System

We also debated:

  • Where is the revolutionary music of this generation?
  • What is the difference between conscious music and positive music?
  • Is reggae supposed to teach or help people?
  • Outside of revolutionary music, what tactics can lead to the results we seek?
  • Does an artist have to be a rasta to be conscious?

The Tastemaker

  • Protoje’s “In Search of Lost Time” album. Notable track, “In Bloom” ft. Lila Ike.
  • Sevana’s ‘Mango’ from the “Be Somebody” EP.
Listen to the Pandora Playlist inspired by this segment.

Buzzworthy

Super Cat releases a new single, “Push Time” with production by Salam Remi. A new album is forthcoming.

Ras Jamal’s Recommended Books for Ongoing Learning

  • The Sankofa Movement: ReAfrikanization and the Reality of War by Kwame Agyei and Akua Nson Akoto.
  • Yurugu: An African-Centered Critique of European Cultural Thought and Behavior by Marimba Ani.
  • Blueprint for Black Power: A Moral, Political, and Economic Imperative for the Twenty-First Century by Amos N. Wilson.
  • Destruction of Black Civilization: Great Issues of a Race from 4500 B.C. to 2000 A.D. by Chancellor Williams.
  • How Europe Underdeveloped Africa by Walter Rodney.
  • Any books by Eric Williams, John Henrik Clarke, or Marcus Garvey.
Listen to the Pandora Playlist inspired by this episode.

Naro from The Fix JA

The Fix JA podcast has been a dominant force in media for quite some time now. The three co-hosts, Naro, Ari, and Javi, have dynamic chemistry and synergy.


The Fix JA features the best of the best of the Jamaican dancehall and reggae scene. They cover what’s hot and bubbling in Kingston from an objective point-of-view. The co-hosts interact with guests in a unique, honest, and real way.


We had the privilege of speaking with Naro, one of the dynamic hosts of The Fix JA, formerly Nightly Fix. From his base on the island of Jamaica, Naro keyed us into many aspects of the culture. If you have yet to check out The Fix, please do so as soon as you finish this episode.


Listen to Reggae Lover Podcast episode 205 – The Fix JA to learn:

  • Do Jamaican youth respect dancehall icons and history?
  • Are young people in Jamaica building sound systems any more?
  • What is the importance of quality media platforms and voices covering our music?
  • Why and how did The Fix JA podcast get started?
  • How did Naro, Javi, and Ari became the co-hosts and develop their chemistry?
  • How does Naro handle the controversy that surrounds him?
  • How does The Fix JA crew get the toughest dancehall personalities to be vulnerable?
  • Why is it important to give upcoming artists an outlet?
  • How does one stay up on the latest dancehall music?
  • What is the state of the Jamaican entertainment industry in this COVID19 era?
  • Why do people around the world have more reverence for reggae than people in Jamaica

It was a dope conversation. We look forward to linking up more in the future. As mentioned in the intro to this episode, we had to scrap the other segments for this week. Look out for more essential content curation in addition to some bonus episodes.

Please visit ReggaeLover.com to catch up on past shows. Make sure to subscribe on your favorite podcast platform.

Reggae Music Forever (Replay)

Our special guest was Shawn from the Reggae Talk podcast and Reggae Music Forever blog.

Reggae Music Forever Reggae Lover Podcast episode cover art image

Certainly, we discussed the state of dancehall/reggae culture with Reggae Music Forever aka Shawn including topics:

  • Firstly, Dancehall supporters versus die-hard fans of roots reggae.
  • Secondly, The overlooked conscious dancehall movement.
  • The American reggae scene.
  • Comparing white and black Americans taste in reggae.
  • Reggae Talk Podcast 1-year Anniversary event.
  • Other passions outside of reggae.
  • Is reggae music on life-support?
  • In conclusion, Predictions for the future.

Resources:

Click here for Full Show Notes and episode transcript.

Why does Black America hate reggae?

Nick from the Jamaican State of Mind podcast joins the Reggae Lover crew once again to discuss the topic: Why does Black America hate reggae?

Reggae Lover artwork - CLICK HERE TO PLAY EPISODE 149 or the reggae lover podcast.

CLICK IMAGE TO PLAY THIS EPISODE.

We analyze different aspects of culture, education, travel, and politics in an attempt to come up with answers.
 
White America had somewhat embraced reggae music by the time Bob Marley’s “Legend” album dropped. Black America as a whole never really joined the movement.
 
We also discuss the reasons why we care about this in the first place. It is a very real conversation from the heart, and worth a listen.

Humble Beginnings | The State of Reggae Culture

Our guest is Fareal Di Realest, artist and co-host of the Reggae Talk podcast.

 reggae lover 141. humble beginnings. Guest FaReal Di Realest.mp3

Click for Free Download

Podcast Episode Summary:
  • Humble Beginnings Tour
  • Wanting to be an inspiration for youths
  • Recent releases
  • The state of Reggae/Dancehall – FaReal agrees with AGARD that genres are dead
  • Rapid Fire Questions
Quotes:
“The goal of the artist is to relate to people.”
– Fareal Di Realest
Resources:
CLICK HERE TO LISTEN AND/OR Download.