Maxi Priest and Jonathan Emile interview

Maxi Priest and Johnathan Emile Interview

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We talk to Maxi Priest and Jonathan Emile who collaborated on Emile’s recently released “Babylon is Falling” Remix.

Maxi Priest

Reggae music has always been at the forefront of social and political issues. One example is Bob Marley’s participation in the Amandla Festival of 1979 in Boston. There, Marley performed in support of the anti-apartheid movement and the liberation of South Africa.  

A few short months ago, the entire world was shaken when George Floyd lost his life.  People protested, buildings and businesses burned – all while in the middle of a worldwide pandemic.  Race relations were already strained, but this event managed to trigger both a national and international outcry for change and justice.

“Babylon is Falling” is a song that has put a voice to the change.  The song features 2 artists (Jonathan Emile and Maxi Priest) from different generations coming together to speak on what they’ve been through, and what’s to come.

Maxi Priest and Jonathan Emile reggae lover podcast cover.

We held reasoning on the following with Maxi Priest and Jonathan Emile:

  • How did the Remix to “Babylon is Falling” featuring Maxi Priest come about?
  • Different flavors of racism in the UK, Canada, and the Southern U.S.
  • The concept behind “Spaces In Between,” Jonathan’s debut reggae album. 
  • Maxi Priest’s excitement for his forthcoming album, “United State of Mind.”
  • Why are some Caribbean people afraid to go back to the region?
  • Billboard’s disrespect towards dancehall culture with their Verzuz cover.
  • What is the responsibility of musicians in fighting oppression?
  • The problem with trying to control musicians’ creative output.

‘Babylon is Falling’ Remix – Jonathan Emile ft Maxi Priest

Two Artists from Different Generations Come Together to Sing About the State of the World Today: 

Canadian-Jamaican artist Jonathan Emile and British-Jamaican artist Maxi Priest came together to create the Remix to “Babylon is Falling”, a track on Emile’s new album, “Spaces In Between.” The album is currently distributed by MindPeaceLove/Tuff Gong International.  While the remix to the song was recorded back in January 2020, neither artist knew at the time that the song would become so relevant a few months later.

Emile is a bilingual (English & French), multi-talented singer-songwriter, producer, and Cancer survivor.  His commanding voice resonates at the start of the song and draws the listener in immediately, asking if they know what their worth is, and then mentions the capitalistic society in which we live.  He then explains that this can’t go on and eventually, something has to change (Babylon will fall). 

“Growing up Black and Jamaican in Montreal, racism has been a fact of life. The institutional side was hidden but the interpersonal is still always present. As a Black person, you know you need to move cautiously to gain access, be accommodated, or have the opportunity to be treated with respect. This caution manifests in how you speak, how you read a room, and how you respond to racist banter or microaggressions.

Knowing that you’re seen as the other, alien, or ‘less than’ is at the forefront as you face people’s prejudice, always having to be an ambassador for your race. You become a master negotiator, code switcher, and an expert in de-escalation to preserve your body and reputation. This is a key concept in Spaces-In-Between.  I am fortunate to have parents who provided me with tactics and strategies to avoid and cope with racism as a young Black Jamaican. The knowledge I received was built on their hard work and determination.”

Jonathan Emile

Grammy-nominated Maxi Priest, best known for his Lover’s Rock and R&B/Reggae fusion tunes like “Close to You’ and “Wild World” comes in next, but he’s not singing about love this time.  In fact, he’s Deejaying (rapping), which in itself is a rare sound for him.  He rides the riddim with the smoothness that he’s best known for, but the content of the lyrics speak of the things he’s both experienced himself throughout the years growing up in England, and what he continues to see around him today.  His message, like so many, is that he’s tired. 

Here we go again – We stand firm we nah ease up the pressure – Just like a volcano bubbling over – to take it to the heights you have fi step like a soldier”

Maxi Priest

Although both Emile and Priest come from different generations, they have many things in common, including being of Jamaican heritage, and growing up and living outside of Jamaica, which has impacted them.  

Like so many people that live abroad, there are mixed feelings right now with what is happening with the racial, economic, and spiritual climate, and the uneasiness that it brings.  “Babylon is Falling” is a song that resonates with everyone, no matter where you come from, or what age you are.  

The Caribbean-American experience with Brian Cox of The Vault: Classic Music Reviews Podcast

The Vault: Classic Music Reviews podcast host, Brian Cox gave us an education on the island of Grenada. 

Brian shared his unique perspective as a first-generation American of Caribbean descent. He described the soundtrack of Grenada, and how music has changed there over time. We learned about the music and food you would encounter at a typical Grenadian party.  

The Vault Classic Music Reviews podcast host, Brian Cox quoted on Reggae Lover podcast.

The Vault: Classic Music Reviews is a top-rated music commentary podcast. The co-hosts, hip-hop fans that grew up in the 90s, review classic hip-hop, R&B, and reggae albums 20 + years after their release. They break these albums down to see if they stood the test of time. Listeners get a perspective on classics from a fresh point of view. The Vault: Classic Music Reviews also includes guest interviews, round table discussions, and artist catalog debates.

Reggae Music Forever (Replay)

Our special guest was Shawn from the Reggae Talk podcast and Reggae Music Forever blog.

Reggae Music Forever Reggae Lover Podcast episode cover art image

Certainly, we discussed the state of dancehall/reggae culture with Reggae Music Forever aka Shawn including topics:

  • Firstly, Dancehall supporters versus die-hard fans of roots reggae.
  • Secondly, The overlooked conscious dancehall movement.
  • The American reggae scene.
  • Comparing white and black Americans taste in reggae.
  • Reggae Talk Podcast 1-year Anniversary event.
  • Other passions outside of reggae.
  • Is reggae music on life-support?
  • In conclusion, Predictions for the future.

Resources:

Click here for Full Show Notes and episode transcript.

The New Music of Jamaica (Replay)

WALSHY FIRE STATED THAT “JAMAICAN ARTISTS ARE ON THE VERGE OF CREATING A NEW GENRE” IN A RECENT INTERVIEW. THIS CLAIM WARRANTED FURTHER EXPLORATION SO WE WENT IN ON THE NEW MUSIC OF JAMAICA.

 

New Music of Jamaica (Replay)

Before analyzing today’s music we reviewed the many genres that Jamaica has created. That amazing history includes Mento, Ska, Rock Steady, Reggae, Dub, and Dancehall. Reggae sub-genres Nyahbingi, lover’s rock, and rub-a-dub are also popular styles.

There was a peak in dancehall popularity in the early 2000s followed by a decline in quality reggae. At that time vinyl formats transitioned to the CD. Then CDs went out and digital downloads came in. As a result, DJs started using laptops to play music and consumers turned to personal electronics. This transitional period subsequently led to what we call the reggae revival.

The current global dancehall and reggae revival movements are creating genre-bending trends. Artists like Protoje, Chronixx, Kabaka Pyramid, Jesse Royal, Damian Marley, Lila Ike, and Koffee are synonymous with such trends.

Based on our analysis there either is a new emerging genre, or the concept of genres is simply dead. Distinctions between genres have become blurred and young audiences around the world are embracing that change.

READ MORE: https://reggaelover.com/

Spirituality in Reggae

Reggae music is the highest form of spiritual music.

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Beginning with the 1970s Roots Reggae era, the lyrics, the drums, and the bass provided the perfect vessel for communicating and spreading messages.

With the help of Bob Marley and the Wailers, these reggae messages spread across the globe.

Exploration of this global phenomenon leads to certain truths.

We discuss some history, events, and examples and give personal accounts of our experiences with spirituality, reggae, and religion.

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The Influence of Reggae

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Discussing the power and cultural impact of reggae music on Jamaica and the world historically and today.

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What life lessons have you learned from listening to reggae music?

In your opinion, what has been the biggest effect on the world as a result of reggae music?

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Success in Reggae

In this episode, we talk about what really validates a reggae artist to a reggae fan.

 

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A unique voice or some crafty lyrics can get you the spotlight for a moment.
There are different ways to measure success in the dancehall/reggae world.
Kahlil Wonda and AGARD go through the possibilities.
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Love After | Jacinth Headlam joins the Reggae Lover Podcast

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Jamaican actress Jacinth Headlam is the special guest joining the crew. Jacinth talks about her Jamaican heritage and her new book “Love After.”

'Diary of a Badman' actress Jacinth Headlam is the special guest joining the crew. Jacinth talks about her Jamaican heritage and her new book 'Love After.' Jacinth is transparent about the challenges and advantages of being a Caribbean woman in entertainment. She talks about her reggae inspiration and favorite artists from then 'til now.

Click Image to download Podcast Episode in MP3 format.

Jacinth is transparent about the challenges and advantages of being a Caribbean woman in entertainment. She talks about her reggae inspiration and favorite artists from then ’til now.

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Bob Marley’s Life and Legacy

As we approach the date that commemorates Bob Marley’s birthday, February 6, we take some time to talk about his amazing legacy. This episode is all about Robert Nesta Marley a.k.a The Legend a.k.a the king of Reggae.

As we approach the date that commemorates Bob Marley's birthday, February 6, we take some time to talk about his amazing legacy. This episode is all about Robert Nesta Marley a.k.a The Legend a.k.a the king of Reggae.

Click image to download podcast mp3 audio.

We list some artists that have been compared to Bob or seen as the next Bob Marley at some point. Then we explore why there hasn’t ever been another artist quite like him. No recording artist has been as revered and respected. We also touch on conspiracy theories circulating around his assassination attempt, and death.
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Roots, Rock, Reggae A Bob Marley Celebration

2 Legendary Jamaican Deejays

Nicodemus and Early B are legendary dancehall stars that were active from the late 70’s until the 90s.

Listen to this tribute mix and learn more about these two bad deejays that inspired the next generation of Jamaican artists.

artwork: reggae lover podcast 119 Early B and Nicodemus mix

Click to download: Early B and Nicodemus mix

Listen for a cool vibe and a Dancehall sound system culture education. This is a labor of love for me. If you respect it, rate it, review it, like it, repost it, share it. The world should know.

Listen/subscribe/follow/favorite/like/repost/download on Apple podcasts, Google podcasts, iHeartRadio, Stitcher, TuneIn, SoundCloud, Radio Public, and search for “Reggae Lover” on other podcast apps.

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Rewind Sundays ft. Highlanda Sound, Copper Ash and Natural Vibes (audio)

Experience the REWIND SUNDAYS ‘Jamaica Love’ Roots & Culture event (recorded live on August 19th) that showcased musical selections from some of Atlanta’s top DJ’s including Highlanda Sound, Natural Vibes and Copper Ash alongside Propa English. It was a musical treat with conscious music flowing through the air.

Who are the Best Vocal Harmony Groups in Reggae?

This mix features reggae’s vocal harmony groups from the 60s, 70s, and 80s.

I took it back to the roots on this one. I focused on songs with an impressive vocal arrangement. This is a specific selection of songs with male singers harmonizing together.

I featured The Wailers, mostly from the “Catch A Fire” album. That album has that very dry, grassroots sound. This was before instrumentation such as horn sections and electric guitars were added. Before the female energy of the I-Threes was added.

The mix also featured some of The Heptones‘ Studio One era hits. I dropped in some original Israel Vibration before they split. Other groups featured are The Techniques, The Abyssinians, The Gladiators, The Sensations, The Mighty Diamonds, and The Silvertones. You also hear songs from Lloyd Parks and We the People, The Sharks, The Royals, The Cables, and The Flames.

Listen to those names and you know these brothers were from a different time. These vocal groups created some of the most beautiful music and the most powerful songs. You feel their passion because of the emphasis conveyed within the harmonies. There was something special about those days.

Best Vocal Harmony Groups | Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 107

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Its the sweet soulful sound of great reggae music! If you enjoy this, check out episode 74. It’s entitled “The Greatest Reggae Bands of All Time (not including the Wailers).” That show features Aswad, Steel Pulse, Third World, Israel Vibration, Black Uhuru, and Inner Circle. Similar material is on The Studio One tribute episodes: 55 and 56.

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It’s a new season of the podcast! I am back in full effect with new shows coming out every week until the end of the year. Thank you so much for listening. If it’s your first time, this is a livication to you, the reggae lover.

Whether you know the songs you hear on this show or not, my goal is that you feel uplifted after listening. I want you to feel joyous and happy. The music should help you to transmute any negative energy into positive. You should enter a different frame of mind via the therapeutic mixes and level up.

For booking information or to sponsor this podcast, email reggaeloverpodcast@gmail.com. Thank you to everybody listening from around the world. I love that you get to tune in and listen to me doing what I love most. We are sharing a vibe and keeping this music alive. Until next time, have a great week. One love!!

One Drop 2018 (Part 1) | Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 101

This episode consists of one-drop (roots and lovers rock) reggae music that came out in late 2017 or early 2018. 

Click image to Download the mix!

I’m committed to curating the best quality new music coming out. I select the best songs and mix them for you here on the podcast. Next week, look out for another great interview. Another unique mix will follow the week after that.

In this mix you hear from:

  • Spiritual with the title single off his new album, ‘Reggae Music.’
  • Micah Shemaiah with a single called ‘Keep On Moving On.’ 
  • The Gratitude Riddim from Irie Vibrations records.
  • The Nice and Easy Riddim from Oneness records.
  • Jah9’s ‘Feel Good’ a late 2017 cut. 
  • The Straight Step Riddim.
  • A Konshens single called ‘If A One Minute.’
  • The Old King Cole Riddim with tracks from Marcia Griffiths, Etana and Jah Cure.
  • Khago with his single ‘Walk A Mile’ off his new album of the same name – a 2017 release.
  • Koffee, ‘Ragamuffin” on the Frankie Music label.
  • Tarrus Riley’s new one ‘Haunted.’
  • The Ouji Riddim from Upsetter Records.
  • Macka B with a tune called ‘Gangster’ off his “Health is Wealth” album.
  • The Slow Rock Riddim with Luciano, Eddie Fitzroy, Chuck Fender, George Nooks, Sugar Minott, and Admiral Tibet. 
  • Beres Hammond’s late for 2017 entry called ‘My Kind of Girl. 
  • New music from Vershon.
  • Wayne Wonder and Kymani Marley on the Love Symbol Riddim.
  • An artist called King Shark with a couple big tunes to close out the mix.

Look for these albums, titles, and riddims to download and add to your playlists. I have some crucial conversations and mixes coming in the next few weeks. Look for a new episode every Monday. 

I wish you all the best things in life. Share a positive message with someone. Share a smile! The Reggae music presented here is food for your soul. I’m going to preserve this medium as a positive platform. Give your energy levels a boost and elevate to higher levels of consciousness. This is a livication to all reggae lovers. Thank you for listening to Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 101.

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Ras Fraser Junior’s ‘Journey to Greatness’ (Interview) | Reggae Lover # 98

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Ras Fraser Jr discusses his new album “Journey to Greatness.”

ras fraser jr. interview

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Find out how this multi-talented musician got his start in the business and why he feels its important to remember your roots. He offers solutions for upcoming reggae artists both in and outside of Jamaica to bump up to the next level and more.

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Sugar Minott | Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 86

Reggae lover podcast episode 86 is about Lincoln Barrington Minott, also known as dancehall music pioneer, Sugar Minott.

Sugar Minott Dancehall Hero

Sugar Minott, Dancehall Hero

In a live dancehall setting during the 1970s, it was common for artists to perform over pre-recorded instrumentals. Sugar Minott was the first artist to recreate that style inside the studio. He worked with Coxsone Dodd and sang new lyrics over the instrumentals of popular Studio One songs.

After leaving Studio One, Minott founded his own record label called the Black Roots. He also founded a sound system called Youth Man Promotions, and later a record label by the same name. His vision was to give young artists an outlet, and a chance to make their name in the music business.

Sugar Minott moved to England where he was achieving more success than he was in Jamaica. The lover’s rock craze started in the UK and Sugar was one of the major players in that movement. While in England he discovered the group Musical Youth.

Back in Jamaica, he’s also credited with discovering many young talents. He gave unknown artists the chance to perform live in the Dancehall and record for the first time. It was Sugar Minott who actually recorded Garnet Silk‘s first song. Other artists associated with the Black Roots and Youthman Promotion movements include Barrington Levy, Little John, Nitty Gritty, Tenor Saw, Junior Reid, Jah Stitch, Ranking Dread and Ranking Joe.

Sugar was a very Dynamic, versatile artist with successful records in different styles. Lovers rock, Roots, covers, dancehall style, and original written material. Sugar Minott recorded for his own record labels, and he worked with other top labels and producers. Working with Mikey Dread, George Phang, Sly and Robbie Jammys, Channel One and with the Bullwackies label out of New York City. Sugar Minott recorded over 60 albums and countless singles.

He passed away in 2010 to heart disease. To see him on stage I was very impressed. Even in his old age, he was a very energetic performer, acting out scenes, jumping, prancing and dancing across the stage. All with his voice still sounding sweet like sugar. Very comfortable in a dancehall setting, he would ask the band or the selector to play some Studio One, and he could sing for hours – entertaining and thrilling the crowd.

I salute the great Sugar Minott. His legacy lives on with his daughter Pashon Minott who is a bonafide recording artist in her own rights. If you enjoy this mix I hope you will add some of the songs to your music collection.

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Glen Washington, George Nooks, Norris Man, and Jah Mason | Reggae Lover 83

This unique mix was requested by a listener in the United Kingdom.

It’s probably the first time any selector has compiled these particular artists on one project, but that is what the Reggae Lover Podcast is all about. Glen Washington, George Nooks, Norris Man, & Jah Mason all began gaining popularity in the mid-to-late 90s, though Glen Washington and George Nooks started their musical careers in the 1970s.

Glen Washington, born in May Pen, Clarendon, Jamaica was a drummer and who toured the world with many different bands and backed many different artists and performers from the 70s through the 80s into the 90s. He migrated to the United States and recorded sporadically as a solo singer but extensively as a drummer. In 1997 when he started to focus on pursuing his solo singing career he did some recording sessions for Studio One and then he sort of blew up with a big hit in 1998 with the song “Kindness for Weakness.” which was marketed by VP records. From there he solidified his career and started to tour the world again as a solo singer.

Like Glen Washington, George Nooks was born in the 1950s in Jamaica. He sang in the youth choir at church, performed at school concerts and talent shows. He professionally recording under the name Prince Mohammed in the 1970s as a deejay. He recorded with Joe Gibbs over the Dennis Brown “How could I leave” instrumental, released an album with General Echo, and had a hit in Jamaica with “40 Leg Dread.” Nooks concentrated on singing starting in the 80s but it was not until 1997 that he released a successful singing album. After 2001 he began singing mostly gospel music.

Norris Man now grew up in the Trench Town area of Jamaica where Bob Marley and the Wailers hail from. He started performing on local sound systems at age 10 deejaying over Studio One riddims. He was small they would put him to stand on top of a Guinness crate and let him get a few songs in. He was actually quite good at it. He started recording at age 22. His first full-length album entitled “Persistence” was released in 1997 on VP records. He linked up with Anthony B and the Star Trail records camp around this time and eventually started touring extensively, taking on stages in California, then Africa, and Europe.

Jah Mason also known as Fire Mason was born in the early 70s in the parish of Manchester and grew up in a Christian family. He began working with Junior Reid’s JR record label in 1995. He joined the Bobo Shanti order of the Rastafari movement. After linking up with the David House Records group got his career took off with the single “my princess gone” among others. He made guest appearances on Singles with his friend Jah Cure and from the mid-nineties through the 2000s Jah Mason released at least one album every year.

If you’re a fan of any of the music that you hear on this episode please go check these artists. They have product in stores that you can purchase and material to stream online. Big Ups 2 the Kingman out of Leicester UK who wanted these artists to be featured here. Thank you so much for joining me on Reggae Lover Podcast episode 83. I hope you enjoy the mix. Its dedicated to you. Bless Up.

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BobFest ATL 2018 featuring Jah9 – Music, Art, Film, Yoga, Food, Family

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REGGAE FANS! YOGIS! FOODIES! FILM FANS! and ALL OF ATL!! You have a lot in store for this year’s BobFest!

BobFest 2018. 7th Annual Festival, a special celebration of Bob Marley and reggae music.

Thursday: Yoga with Jah9 and friends Feb 15

Thursday: Yoga with Jah9 and friends Feb 15

Friday: Concert in the Village (and village marketplace!) featuring Jah9 FOR THE FIRST TIME IN ATL, lyrical genius SaRoc and More- Feb 16

Friday: Concert in the Village (and village marketplace!) featuring Jah9 FOR THE FIRST TIME IN ATL, lyrical genius SaRoc and More- Feb 16

Saturday: AFRICA UNITE Film Festival- Feb 17

Saturday: AFRICA UNITE Film Festival- Feb 17

Sunday: Stir It Up Farm to Table Feast!- Feb 18

Sunday: Stir It Up Farm to Table Feast!- Feb 18

You don’t want to miss out on this exciting lineup! Purchase your tickets today at bobfestatl.com. Email bobfestatlinfo@gmail.com for volunteer, sponsor, and vendor information.
Check out a perfect tool and example of the creativity everyone can offer in his/her own voice:

Spragga Benz Greatest Hits Tribute Mix | Reggae Lover Podcast # 80

The best of Spragga, from ‘Jack it Up’ to ‘Shotta Culture.

He began his career around 1991. Once known to his friends as
Episode 80 – Reggae Lover Podcast – Spragga Benx Mix. Click links below.

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King Jammys Tribute (2nd Volume) | Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 79

By popular demand, we feature more classic dancehall hits from the legendary King Jammys catalog.

79 - Reggae Lover Podcast - King Jammys Tribute (2nd Volume)

79 – Reggae Lover Podcast – King Jammys Tribute (2nd Volume)

Imagine going to a dance and hearing a massive sound system playing.  The records you hear are brand new exclusives being debuted.  The ground shakes with the bass line.

Then the presentation climaxes.  The top recording artists in the land vocally accentuate your vibes with live freestyles over amazing instrumental music tracks.

This was the experience at a dancehall session in the 1980s with world-famous King Jammy‘s Sound System out of the Waterford section of Kingston, Jamaica.

The King Jammys Tribute (1st Volume) episode is definitely the most popular podcast episode of this series on iTunes and SoundCloud. A big thank you to everybody who’s been listening.

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King Jammys Tribute (1st Volume) | Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 78

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We salute our dancehall trailblazer, king of digital reggae, sound system owner/producer Lloyd James aka KING JAMMY. This is the first half of a megamix featuring some big tunes and riddims from the Jammys catalog.

78 - Reggae Lover Podcast - King Jammys Tribute (1st Volume)

78 – Reggae Lover Podcast – King Jammys Tribute (1st Volume)

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TUNE IN RADIO: FAVORITE AND LISTEN HERE.

STITCHER RADIO: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN HERE.

For more King Jammys vibes check out episode 4 (Sanchez, L.U.S.T and Friends – 80s Lovers Rock), episode 5 (Superstars Hit Parade 1987-1989 Tunes/Riddims), episode 10 (Dancehall Time Traveling Back to the 80s and 90s), episode 36 (Stalag meets Sleng Teng), episode 39 (A Late Eighties Reggae Dream 1979-1991).

Also see our tribute episodes featuring Cocoa Tea, Sanchez, Johnny Osbourne, Frankie Paul, and Josey Wales – artists who all recorded hits released on the Jammy’s label. Lots more to come… all dedicated to you, #reggaelover.