2 Bad Riddims: The Stalag versus The Sleng Teng

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stalag-sleng_teng

It’s brings me great pleasure to release this episode of the Reggae Lover Podcast which features two riddims that were suggested by my listeners: the Stalag version and the Sleng Teng rhythm. If you have ever been to a reggae dance or concert, you have definitely heard songs on one or both of these legendary riddim tracks which have had a dominating prominence in the dancehall for three decades.

I selected this 22 song playlist out of the hundreds of tunes that have been recorded over these versions. The mix is comprised mostly of the original cuts produced by Winston “Techniques” Riley and Lloyd ‘King Jammy’ James. Please submit playlist suggestions and feedback to ReggaeLoverPodcast@gmail.com.

In Jamaica, the Stalag version (or Stalag riddim) is a popular reggae rhythm, which came to prominence in the 1970s. It was originally written and performed as “Stalag 17” (named after the 1953 war film) by Ansell Collins, and released by Winston Riley‘s Techniques record label in 1973.

It was mainly used for dub instrumental versions, often b-sides of records. The rhythm also influenced early hip-hop, and can be discerned on Public Enemy’s hit ‘Don’t Believe the Hype’ as well as on Too Short’s Blowjob Betty.

Sleng Teng is the name given to the first fully computerized riddim in Jamaican music. The riddim, which was created by the collaboration between King Jammy and Wayne Smith, was titled “Under Mi Sleng Teng“. Wayne Smith found the computerized sound in Noel Davey’s keyboard, and together he and Davey arranged the riddim, slowed it down, matched it to Smith’s key, and rehearsed on it with lyrics inspired by Barrington Levy’s “Under Mi Sensi” and Yellowman’s “Under me fat ting”, before taking it to Jammy’s studio in late 1984. The riddim itself is apparently an attempt to recreate Eddie Cochran’s 1959 rockabilly song “Somethin’ Else.” It is a pattern found in the Casio MT-40 home keyboard.

After the riddim was brought to the studio and Jammy heard it, he then slowed it further and placed piano and a clap on it. Jammy recorded a number of other artists on the original backing track including Tenor Saw (with “Pumpkin Belly”), and Johnny Osbourne (with “Buddy Bye”). The tunes were first unleashed at a now legendary soundclash between Jammy’s own sound system and Black Scorpio at Waltham Park Road on February 23, 1985.

Stalag 17 Playlist

1 Frankie Paul – Don’t Worry Yourself – Volcano
2 General Echo – Arlene – Techniques
3 Admiral Tibett – Trouble To A Man – Techniques
4 Little Kirk – Whats Love Got To Do – Techniques
5 Yami Bolo – Take It Easy – Techniques
6 Cocoa Tea – We Do The Killing – Digital B
7 Super Beagle – Soundboy Dust Out – Techniques
8 Tenor Saw and Buju Banton – Ring The Alarm Quick – Techniques
9 Sister Nancy – Bam Bam – Techniques
10 Cutty Ranks – Rude Bwoy Game – Techniques
11 Nicodemus – Suzy Wong – Skengdon

Sleng Teng Playlist

1 Wayne Smith – Under Me Sleng Teng – Jammys
2 Tenor Saw – Pumpkin Belly – Jammys
3 Echo Minott – Original Fat Ting – Jammys
4 Buddy Bye – Johnny Osbourne – Jammys
5 Josey Wales – Cowboy Style – Jammys
6 Yelloman – Reggae Ambassador – Jammys
7 Tony Curtis – Weak – John John
8 Anthony Red Rose – Under Me Fat Ting – King Tubbys
9 John Wayne – Call The Police For Me – Jammys
10 Super Cat – Trash and Ready – Jammys
11 Frankie Paul – Cassandra – Steely and Clevie

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The Legendary Satta Massagana Riddim Mix

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This mix features the the Satta riddim, short for Satta MassaganaSatta Massagana is a roots reggae album released by The Abyssinians officially in 1976. It is widely considered The Abyssinians’ crowning achievement and a classic roots reggae album. The title track “Satta Massagana” was a huge hit and has been versioned numerous times by both The Abyssinians and other artists since. It has even been adopted by some Rastafarian groups as a hymn used during services. The song, which translates from the Amharic language as “He Gave Praise”, was originally recorded for Studio One in 1969, but the label’s owner, Clement “Coxsone” Dodd declined to release it.

The Reggae Lover Podcast A reggae podcast to connect fans with the beautiful music they love, selected and mixed by international DJ and reggae lover, Kahlil Wonda of Highlanda Sound. Promotional use of songs only. New episodes are featured every Monday. Categories  general Archives  2014 March  March 2014 SMT WT FS  	 	   	 	 	 	 	 	1 2	3	4	5	6	7	8 9	10	11	12	13	14	15 16	17	18	19	20	 21 22 23	 24 25	26	27	28	29 30	31   Syndication    Online Marketing Add blog to blog directory at OnToplist.com.

#ReggaeLover Episode 3

Also featured in this episode is Title Riddim which was released in 1988.  The late, great singer Wayne Smith (yes he sang more than just Sleng Teng) delivers the blessing with “Jah Is Our Light” before the Soundbwoy Killing tunes start to flow.  Even if you don’t know the artists singing at this point it matters not because the vibes are ever-present and the mixes come smoothly and quickly enough to hopefully put you in trance.

Episode 3 ventures away from the more commercially popular and hit songs mixed in the first 2 Reggae Lover shows and the riddim driven nature of this mix also lends a different type of vibe. Check the playlist and leave a comment below.

Thank you for listening!  Requests? Feedback? Email ReggaeLoverPodcast@gmail.com to interact directly with me and also leave a comment below.

Playlist:

1   Wayne Smith – Jah is Our Light
2   Sugar Minott – Can’t Cross the Border
3   Chipi Prophet – Hard Nut To Crack
4   Trevor Levy – Kill A Sound Tonight
5   Scion Success – General
6   Pad Anthony – The Title
7   Ranking Joe – Original General
8   Abbysinians – Satta Massa Gana
9   Bernard Collins – Satta Me No Born Yah
10  Bernard Collins – Satta Don
11  Big Youth – I Pray Thee
12  Prince Far I – Wisdom
13  U-Roy – Blessed
14  Dennis Brown – It Is A Fact
15  Luciano – Man Of Order
16  Jah mali – Cornerstone
17  Anthony B – Good and Bad
18  Capleton – Dislocate
19  Capleton – Raggy Road
20  Sizzla – One Away

Direct mp3 download

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Reggae Vault Classics ‘Tribute to King Jammy’s’ by Highlanda

Reggae Vault Classics presents a Tribute to the legendary King Jammy‘s label.

  1. Josey Wales – Water Come A Me Eye
  2. Buju Banton – Sound Fi Dead

    King Jammy

    Cover of King Jammy

  3. Cocoa Tea – Crying Time
  4. Little Twitch – Spanish Fly
  5. Bushman – Grow Your Natty
  6. Cocoa Tea – Uptight Saturday Night
  7. Sanchez – End of The Road
  8. Sanchez – Mr. Sea (Love Songs)
  9. Frankie Paul – I Know The Score
  10. Dennis Brown – Love Is Never to Say You’re Sorry
  11. Leroy Gibbons – I’m Missing You
  12. Cocoa Tea – The Toughest

    Dennis Brown

    Cover of Dennis Brown

  13. Pinchers – Bandelero
  14. Wayne Smith – Ain’t No Meaning
  15. Shinehead – Good Love
  16. Nitty Gritty – Draw Mi Mark
  17. Admiral Bailey and Chaka Demus – One Scotch
  18. Super Cat – Boops
  19. Supercat – Jamaica Jamaica
  20. Johnny Osborne – Wnat A La La

    Super Cat

    Cover of Super Cat

  21. Nitty Gritty – Good Morning Teacher
  22. Wayne Smith – Come Along
  23. Wayne Smith – Under Me Sleng Teng
  24. John Wayne – Call The Police
  25. Tenor Saw – Pumpkin Belly
  26. Johnny Osborne – Budy Bye
  27. Supercat – Trash and Ready
  28. Echo Minott – Original Fat Ting
  29. Ninjaman – Murder Dem
  30. Tony Curtis – Weak
  31. Leroy Gibbon – This Magic Moment
  32. Frankie Paul – Cassanova
  33. Yellowman – Run Come
  34. Courtney Melody ft Danny Dread – Call Me Angel
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King Jammy’s Hit Songs: A History and Musical Mix

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The ‘80s was the age of dancehall and Lloyd ‘Jammy’ James was King.  King Jammys’ label churned out hit after hit, while his Sound System ruled the streets of Jamaica.

The ‘80s was the age of dancehall and Lloyd ‘Jammy’ James was King.  King Jammys' label churned out hit after hit, while his Sound System ruled the streets of Jamaica.     Listen to this Reggae Vault Classics  Featured Icon segment paying tribute  to the pioneering producer that forever changed the sound of reggae music.

Download Reggae Vault Classics episode #52

 Listen to this Reggae Vault Classics  Featured Icon segment paying tribute  to the pioneering producer that forever changed the sound of reggae music.