Third World Band In ATL for 50th Ann. of Jamaica’s Independence – Rialto Series

In celebration of the 50th anniversary of Jamaica’s independence, Third World Band, one of the world’s longest-running reggae bands, will bring over three decades of their trademark “cutting-edge, positive, progressive, and internationally relevant” music to the Rialto stage.  Formed in 1973, the group has released 23 albums, amassing 10 GRAMMY nominations and being awarded the 1986 United Nations Peace Medal. Throughout their storied career, they have collaborated with acts ranging from the Jackson 5 to Bob Marley and The Wailers to Stevie Wonder.

This is a Rialto Series performance.

Reggae Vault Classics Pays Tribute to the Emperor

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To commemorate the birthday of Emperor Haile Selassie IHighlanda Sound SystemThe Honorary Citizen, and DaFlavaRadio.com will hold a special Reggae Vault Classics event on Thursday, July 19 at The Royal Peacock, a legendary hot spot draped in African-American and Caribbean culture located at 186 Auburn Avenue in the historic Sweet Auburn district of downtown Atlanta.  General admission to the celebration is $10 and doors are scheduled to open at 10:00 p.m.

The Royal Peacock’s stage has been graced by the likes of Muddy Waters, B.B. King, Fats Domino, Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, Gladys Knight, Stevie Wonder, Miles Davis, Sam Cooke, The Four Tops, the Isley Brothers, Ray Charles, Otis Redding, Marvin Gaye, and Little Richard.  In more recent times legendary acts of dancehall and reggae such as Burning Spear, Freddie McGregor, Tony Rebel, Johnny Osborne, Brigadier Jerry, Josey Wales, Anthony B, Bush Man, Mad Cobra, Patra, Warrior King, Downbeat, Killamanjaro, Metro Media, Stone Love, Bass Odyssey and numerous others have performed there to the delight of many.

The organizers of the Reggae Vault Classics event have succeeded in their mission to bring the great musical tradition and positive messages of foundation Reggae culture to diverse audiences of increasing numbers each month.  Due to the rich history of The Royal Peacock this unique event has now found a fitting venue.

It’s now time again for royal reggae inside of The Royal Peacock,” Super Pec of Highlanda Sound System.

For more information about the Reggae Vault Classics movement, email VaultClassics@gmail.com.

THIRD WORLD KICKS OFF THEIR 35TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION AT THE JAMAICA JAZZ AND BLUES FESTIVAL

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With smash hits, sold-out tours and inspirational messages, the Third World Band will kick into a high gear the celebration of their milestone Anniversary.  The Reggae Ambassadors will officially launch a year-long celebration at the 2010 Jamaica Jazz and Blues Festival on Saturday, January 30th in Trelawny, Jamaica.

Celebrating 35 years in the industry, Third World – one of the longest running Reggae band – is an institution that produces and performs music that is cutting edge, positive, progressive and internationally relevant. Formed in 1973, the group has released a total of 22 albums as well as solo projects from Lead Singer Bunny Rugs and Guitarist Cat Coore.  This does not include their new unreleased album entitled “Patriots” which will be released in early 2010.  They have received numerous awards, including an Award in 2009 from Brooklyn Academy of Music (“BAM”), the 1986 “United Nations Peace Medal,” 1992 and 1996 Jamaica Music Industry Awards for Best Show Band and 10 Grammy nominations.  Additionally, the group has worked and collaborated with top acts such as the Jackson Five, Bob Marley and The Wailers and Stevie Wonder.

On January 30, 2010, Third World will add yet another accomplishment to their already impressive resume as the Group is slated to share the main stage with chart topping acts such as Grammy winning R&B crooner Kenneth “Babyface” Edmonds and Erykah Badu along with Gladys Knight, Billy Ocean, The Whispers, Joss Stone, Monty Alexander, Joe Roy Jackson and the Queens Project featuring Tamia, Kelly Price and Deborah Cox. Patrons can expect to see the Third World Band perform international hit singles and fan favorites such as “Now That We’ve Found Love,” “96 Degrees in the Shade,” “Try Jah Love,” and “Sense of Purpose.”

Turn-Key Productions 14th staging of the Jazz and Blues festival, which is known for attracting thousands of patrons and media outlets from the United States, Europe and the Caribbean, is being sponsored by the Jamaica Tourist Board, Air Jamaica, Iberostar, Rose Hall Resort and Spa, CVM TV and the Gleaner Company.  As stated by Richard Daley, Bass player and original member, “It is a great honor for us to perform at the Jamaica Jazz and Blues Festival.  It is the perfect event for us to kick-off our year-long 35thAnniversary celebration.”

Prior to their performance on Saturday night, Third World Band will be hosting a Press Conference on Friday, January 29, 2010.  During the press conference, the Group will announce upcoming performances and plans for an international tour.  The venue, along with the time, will be announced at a later date.  Until then, all media inquiries should be directed to Triple 7 Entertainment LLC by calling (201) 981-6960 USA(876) 475-5841 Jamaica or emailmedia@triple7entllc.com.

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Jamrock Reggaefest with Beres Hammond & Friends Saturday – July 18, 2009 in NY

Jamrock Reggaefest

Musical legends Frankie Paul and John Holt join Beres Hammond on stage at the 12th Annual JAMROCK Reggae Fest! Come seeFrankie “Dancehall” Paul, the father of Rock Steady, John Holt along with the originator of Lover’s Rock, Beres Hammond, all on one stage. Newly added acts are Culture featuring Kenyatta Hill and Lenya Wilks along with Natural Blacks. This classic lineup is a guaranteed crowd-pleaser with phenomenal performances at the Westchester County Center in White Plains, New York, on Saturday, July 18, 2009. Tickets are now available through Ticketmaster, Reggaefest.com and various locations through out the tri-state area with ticket prices starting at just $49.99!

Kenyatta Hill is the son of the late Joseph Hill, front man of Culture, the legendary vocal trio whose 1977 record “Two Sevens Clash” helped define the roots reggae genre. In August 2006, while on tour in Berlin, Germany, Joseph Hill suddenly fell ill and passed away. Kenyatta has since carried the torch successfully performing as the front man for Culture and paying tribute to his father with every performance.

Natural Blacks, the Guyanese-born roots singer has made a persistent stance in reggae with songs like “Far from Reality” and “Never Leave You Lonely.” His style and personality has made him a favorite among some of the top record producers and fans in Jamaica, and throughout the Caribbean.

Frankie Paul is often referred to as Jamaica’s Stevie Wonder, and not just because of his visual impairment; like Wonder, he was a talented multi-instrumentalist with a tremendous vocal range. He was also extraordinarily prolific; part of the first wave of dancehall artists, he started his recording career in earnest during the early ’80s, and has since flooded the market with product, releasing countless singles and well over 30 albums. Fans can look forward to hits like “Tidal Wave,” “Sara” and “Slow Down.

John Holt has delivered timeless reggae classics like “Police in Helicopter,” “Stick by Me,” and “Ali Baba.” The former lead singer of the Parogons still stands head and shoulders above the rest as one of Jamaica’s sweetest singers and enduring songwriters. He has voiced and penned so many of the country’s classics that in a way, Holt has defined the island’s sound.

Known to many as the “Otis Redding of Reggae,” Beres Hammond has been writing, producing and pouring out his smoky-sweet voice over soulful reggae riddims for over three decades. From his early days as the lead singer of the ’70s funk-reggae infused band Zap Pow, Beres has consistently produced hits and number one singles. As the cornerstone to Lover’s Rock, he has inspired the next generation of reggae soul singers and international superstars like Wyclef Jean and Alicia Keys. Fans can look forward to hearing timeless classics like “Tempted to Touch,” and “Rock Away,” as well as material from his latest album, A Moment in Time.

Tickets are now available through Ticketmaster, Reggaefest.com and at various  Tri-State area ticket locations. Log on to www.reggaefest.com for more information and location details.

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Big Bands of Reggae

Highlanda.net:

“Nothing compares to being in a venue where a reggae band is performing live.  The rumble of the bass lines surround you in a warm embrace and you can’t help but to rock and skank as you are transported to another realm and higher level of consciousness.  This describes the effects of the power that live reggae musicians have over the masses.”


Third World

Third World is a Grammy nominated Jamaican reggae band formed in 1973. Their sound is influenced by soul, funk and disco. Third World’s greatest success came in the late 1970s and early 1980s, peaking with their cover version of The O’Jays’ “Now That We Found Love”, a hit single on both sides of the Atlantic in 1979. Here is a Third World performing “Now That We Found Love:”
This song brought them to the attention of Stevie Wonder, who worked with them and wrote (along with Melody A. McCully) their song “Try Jah Love.” This band still records and tours to this day so definitely check them out if they come to a venue near you. Visit Third World online at http://www.thirdworldband.com/

Inner Circle

This Jamaican reggae group was formed in 1968 by the brothers Ian and Roger Lewis in Jamaica. The band released its debut album in 1974 on the famed record label, Trojan Records, and resigned in 1979 to Island Records, where the internationally successful album Everything Is Great originated. They are responsible for the 1989 song “Bad Boys,” which serves as the theme song for Fox Network’s long-running television program COPS. Here is Inner Circle with “Bad Boys:”
Jacob Miller, the frontman and lead singer, was killed in a car crash on March 23, 1980. The band appeared in the reggae cult film Rockers in 1978. Their second American hit, reaching #16 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1993 was “Sweat (A La La La La Long)”, which was a #3 hit in the UK. Here is Inner Circle with “Sweat:”

Steel Pulse
Steven Huey reports, “Generally a protest-minded Rastafarian outfit, Steel Pulse started out playing authentic roots reggae with touches of jazz and Latin music, and earned a substantial audience among white U.K. punks as well. Their 1978 debut, Handsworth Revolution, is still regarded by many critics as a landmark and a high point of British reggae. As the ’80s wore on, slick synthesizers and elements of dance and urban R&B gradually crept into their sound, even as their subject matter stayed on the militant side. By the late ’80s, Steel Pulse had won a Grammy and were working full-fledged crossover territory, but never reached the same degree of commercial acceptance as Aswad or Inner Circle. They subsequently returned to a tough-minded, rootsy sound that nonetheless made concessions to contemporary trends with touches of dancehall and hip-hop.” Here is Steel Pulse performing “Rally Round:”
In 1993 they performed at Bill Clinton’s inaugural celebration, the first reggae band to appear at such an event. Visit Steel Pulse’s website for more.

Aswad
From Vh1: “Aswad was arguably Britain’s most successful reggae band, in terms of both popularity and longevity. Critical opinion on their body of work is often divided; some hail their early material as the greatest roots reggae Britain ever produced, while others find their later pop-crossover phase more distinctive and unique, even at the expense of authenticity. Regardless, Aswad’s ability to adapt themselves to the changing times — new musical trends, shifting personnel — was ultimately the driving force behind their decades-long career.”
Aswad was often hired as backing musicians for touring Jamaican stars: Bob Marley, Burning Spear, Dennis Brown, and Black Uhuru.