Sugar Minott | Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 86

Reggae lover podcast episode 86 is about Lincoln Barrington Minott, also known as dancehall music pioneer, Sugar Minott.

Sugar Minott Dancehall Hero

Sugar Minott, Dancehall Hero

In a live dancehall setting during the 1970s, it was common for artists to perform over pre-recorded instrumentals. Sugar Minott was the first artist to recreate that style inside the studio. He worked with Coxsone Dodd and sang new lyrics over the instrumentals of popular Studio One songs.

After leaving Studio One, Minott founded his own record label called the Black Roots. He also founded a sound system called Youth Man Promotions, and later a record label by the same name. His vision was to give young artists an outlet, and a chance to make their name in the music business.

Sugar Minott moved to England where he was achieving more success than he was in Jamaica. The lover’s rock craze started in the UK and Sugar was one of the major players in that movement. While in England he discovered the group Musical Youth.

Back in Jamaica, he’s also credited with discovering many young talents. He gave unknown artists the chance to perform live in the Dancehall and record for the first time. It was Sugar Minott who actually recorded Garnet Silk‘s first song. Other artists associated with the Black Roots and Youthman Promotion movements include Barrington Levy, Little John, Nitty Gritty, Tenor Saw, Junior Reid, Jah Stitch, Ranking Dread and Ranking Joe.

Sugar was a very Dynamic, versatile artist with successful records in different styles. Lovers rock, Roots, covers, dancehall style, and original written material. Sugar Minott recorded for his own record labels, and he worked with other top labels and producers. Working with Mikey Dread, George Phang, Sly and Robbie Jammys, Channel One and with the Bullwackies label out of New York City. Sugar Minott recorded over 60 albums and countless singles.

He passed away in 2010 to heart disease. To see him on stage I was very impressed. Even in his old age, he was a very energetic performer, acting out scenes, jumping, prancing and dancing across the stage. All with his voice still sounding sweet like sugar. Very comfortable in a dancehall setting, he would ask the band or the selector to play some Studio One, and he could sing for hours – entertaining and thrilling the crowd.

I salute the great Sugar Minott. His legacy lives on with his daughter Pashon Minott who is a bonafide recording artist in her own rights. If you enjoy this mix I hope you will add some of the songs to your music collection.

STITCHER RADIO: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN HERE.79 - Reggae Lover Podcast - King Jammys Tribute (2nd Volume)

GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN HERE.GOOGLE PLAY MUSIC: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN to reggae lover HERE.

TUNE IN RADIO: FAVORITE AND LISTEN HERE.TUNE IN RADIO: FAVORITE AND LISTEN to reggae lover HERE.

SOUNDCLOUD: CLICK TO DOWNLOAD OR PLAY EPISODE.SOUNDCLOUD: CLICK TO DOWNLOAD OR PLAY EPISODE 80

APPLE PODCAST: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN VIA ITUNES.APPLE Music PODCAST: SUBSCRIBE AND LISTEN to Reggae Lover VIA ITUNES.

 

 

 

 
Advertisements
Highlanda Sound live set

Live DJ set: “When Highlanda Sound brought reggae to Buckhead”

It has always been my belief that people want authenticity in their music regardless of the venue.  As a DJ, I have had the privilege of performing at high-end and hole-in-the-wall venues, but this did not mean that I had to switch up my playlist.

As a party builds, and the crowd begins to increase in size, it’s important for the DJ to control the vibe and energy in the room by not starting out too fast.  A gradual increase of the pace sets a solid foundation for the energetic climax later in the night that should take place.

To illustrate this, I have curated some audio of a live set recorded at one of my first residencies in the Buckhead party district of Atlanta during the early 2000’s – when nightlife carried on until 4am in the city.  This was the hottest attraction in the city at the ultra sexy upscale venue, Kream – the same one mentioned by Jermaine Dupri in the song “Welcome to Atlanta.”

It was important for me to give a really organic representation of how a reggae dancehall sound system controls a dance, not only for the entertainment of the patrons but also because I wanted my guest DJs to feel comfortable enough to go hard with the crowd when it was their turn to take control.  Once the foundation is set with a good “early-warm,” it’s then much easier and much more likely that the dance will erupt in excitement later on.

My set commences with strictly veteran singers from the 1970’s and 1980’s like John Holt, Sugar Minott, Nitty Gritty, Dennis Brown, The Heptones and Barrington Levy.  After about 40 minutes, selections from the 1990’s could be heard with the first Everton Blender tunes, Luciano, and a Garnett Silk mega mix.  Listen as the MC, SuperPEC welcomes several people to the dance, and a crowd gathers for the ensuing festivities.  Listen as I carefully advance the pace and turn up the heat while watching the dancefloor start to bubble.

Click below to stream or download audio mp3.

If you’d like to book me to as your DJ for an upcoming event please click here.

The Greatest Studio One Riddims in Dancehall – Reggae Lover Podcast 56

3

The original styles of the most popular riddims in dancehall history are all right here in this mix.  Most of the mega hits from the 1980s and 1990s dancehall era’s were remade digital versions of the classics you will hear in this mix.

artwork: The Greatest Studio One Riddims in Dancehall Mix by Highlanda Sound, Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 56

The Greatest Studio One Riddims in Dancehall Mix by Highlanda Sound, Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 56

If you downloaded Ultimate Studio One Riddims – Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 55, then this will be a great companion.  This segment is more uptempo and even more iconic in content with no songs repeated from the previous mix (except my Little Pinchers dubplate which is on a different riddim).  If you should enjoy, please do leave a comment and share.


Tracklist:
1. Amazing Sound – Mikey General (dubplate)
2. Love is A Feeling – Earl Sixteen
3. Give Praise – Luciano (dubplate)
4. Heptones Gonna Fight – The Heptones
5. Give Love A Try – Barry Brown
6. Here I Stand – Carlton Livingston
7. Pretty Looks Isn’t All – The Heptones
8. The Girl is Mine – Frankie Paul
9. Never Give Up – Sugar Minott
10. Compliments to Studio One – Michigan and Smiley
11. Babylon Bridge – Dillinger
12. Bobby Babylon – Freddie McGregor
13. No Call Me Cracky – Lone Ranger
14. Take a Ride – Al Campbell
15. Truths and Rights – Johnny Osbourne
16. Automatic – Lone Ranger
17. Created By the Father – Dennis Brown
18. New Millennium – Wayne Marshall
19. I’m Just a Guy – Alton Ellis
20. Vanity – Sugar Minott
21. Rub a Dub Style – Michigan and Smiley
22. Highlanda Kill Your Sound – Warrior King (dubplate)
23. Ram Dance Master – Brigadier Jerry
24. She Gone She Gone – Linval Thompson
25. Program – Frankie Paul
26. You A Fool Boy – Angela Prince
27. Deliver Us – Half Pint
28. Rougher Yet – Slim Smith
29. Come To Me – The Jay Tees
30. Our Love – Yami Bolo
31. Love Bump – Lone Ranger
32. No Say So – Little John
33. Feel Like Jumping – Marcia Griffiths
34. Greatest Sound In The Dance – XO (dubplate)
35. Highlanda Run Yah So – Little Pinchers (dubplate)
36. Highlanda Bus – Sluggy Ranks (dubplate)
37. Render Your Heart – Sluggy Ranks
38. Armageddon Time – Willie Williams
39. Lend Me The Sixteen – Johnny Osbourne
40. Nice Up the Dance – Michigan and Smiley
41. Keep On Moving – Johnny Osbourne
42. Never Let Go – Slim Smith
43. I Shall Sing – Marcia Griffiths
44. The Answer – Lone Ranger
45. No Regrets – Carlton Livingston
47. Can’t Buy My Love – Johnny Osbourne
48. Consider Me – Jennifer Lara
49. I Don’t Know Why – Doreen Shaffer
50. No War – Johnny Osbourne
51. Jah Jah Children – Sugar Minott
52. Far East – Barry Brown
53. Jam It Up – Carlton Livingston