The Dominance of King Jammy and Biltmore Era Riddims

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Reggae Lover Podcast 39The episode commences with the Sly and Robbie produced version of the Randy Newman song,

Reggae Lover Podcast 39B

The episode commences with the Sly and Robbie produced version of the Randy Newman song, “Baltimore” from 1979 sung by The Tamlins. Courtney Melody and Dennis Brown follow with big tunes on the Baltimore Riddim before the hit from mighty King Jammys catalog, Dennis Brown’s “The Exit.”

Wayne Fire’s “Sexy Body” (1991) and “Come Down” by Super Cat from 1988 on the Wild Apache label launch the mix into the late 1980s. Listen for a Kenneth Hoo Kim produced version of the Hypocrite riddim released in 1984, and then almost every song after that point involves producers Bobby Digital, Steely and Clevie, and/or King Jammys.

The highlight is the Duck aka Duck Dance riddim from 1988. This was a time when Jammy’s label usually had 10 out of the top 20 songs on Jamaica’s charts and Admiral Bailey was the dominant artist in dancehall and on stage shows.

Tracklist

1 The Tamlins – Baltimore
2 Courtney Melody – In The Streets
3 Dennis Brown – The More I Excel
4 Dennis Brown – The Exit
5 Wayne Fire – Sexy Body
6 Super Cat – Come Down
7 Wayne Smith – Karma Chameleon
8 Tony Tuff – Gone Clear
9 Don Angelo – Settlement
10 Earl Sixteen – Come A Long Way
11 Midnight Rider – Hypocrite
12 Pad Anthony – Rub A Dub A Play
13 Johnny Osbourne – Gentle Is The Sound
14 Derrick Parker – My Heart Is Gone
15 Singing Melody – Hurry Back Home
16 Shabba Ranks – Gal Yuh Good
17 Shabba Ranks – Pay Down Pon It
18 Little Twitch – Watch Your Friends Them
19 Anthony Malvo – Run For Your Life
20 Josey Wales – Stamp Out
21 Tiger – The Dam Thing
22 Ninja Man – More Reality
23 Admiral Bailey – Them Have Fe Wait
24 Papa San – Style and Fashion
25 Chaka Demus – Bad Bad Shaka
26 Flourgon – Bounce
27 Red Dragon – Duck Dance
28 Singing Melody and Johnny P – Say You Love Me Baby
29 Bunny General – Must Get Defeat
30 Johnny P – Sound A Sound
31 Cocoa Tea and Charlie Chaplin – Lets Give Thanks
32 John Mouse – Me A Me
33 Chevell Franklyn – No One In The World
34 Lady Venus – Best Friend A Gi You Bun
35 Clement Irie – Loving
36 Johnny P – Cut Up
37 Lady Patra – Gun Inna Panty
38 Ninja Man – Heartical Don

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2 Bad Riddims: The Stalag versus The Sleng Teng

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stalag-sleng_teng

It’s brings me great pleasure to release this episode of the Reggae Lover Podcast which features two riddims that were suggested by my listeners: the Stalag version and the Sleng Teng rhythm. If you have ever been to a reggae dance or concert, you have definitely heard songs on one or both of these legendary riddim tracks which have had a dominating prominence in the dancehall for three decades.

I selected this 22 song playlist out of the hundreds of tunes that have been recorded over these versions. The mix is comprised mostly of the original cuts produced by Winston “Techniques” Riley and Lloyd ‘King Jammy’ James. Please submit playlist suggestions and feedback to ReggaeLoverPodcast@gmail.com.

In Jamaica, the Stalag version (or Stalag riddim) is a popular reggae rhythm, which came to prominence in the 1970s. It was originally written and performed as “Stalag 17” (named after the 1953 war film) by Ansell Collins, and released by Winston Riley‘s Techniques record label in 1973.

It was mainly used for dub instrumental versions, often b-sides of records. The rhythm also influenced early hip-hop, and can be discerned on Public Enemy’s hit ‘Don’t Believe the Hype’ as well as on Too Short’s Blowjob Betty.

Sleng Teng is the name given to the first fully computerized riddim in Jamaican music. The riddim, which was created by the collaboration between King Jammy and Wayne Smith, was titled “Under Mi Sleng Teng“. Wayne Smith found the computerized sound in Noel Davey’s keyboard, and together he and Davey arranged the riddim, slowed it down, matched it to Smith’s key, and rehearsed on it with lyrics inspired by Barrington Levy’s “Under Mi Sensi” and Yellowman’s “Under me fat ting”, before taking it to Jammy’s studio in late 1984. The riddim itself is apparently an attempt to recreate Eddie Cochran’s 1959 rockabilly song “Somethin’ Else.” It is a pattern found in the Casio MT-40 home keyboard.

After the riddim was brought to the studio and Jammy heard it, he then slowed it further and placed piano and a clap on it. Jammy recorded a number of other artists on the original backing track including Tenor Saw (with “Pumpkin Belly”), and Johnny Osbourne (with “Buddy Bye”). The tunes were first unleashed at a now legendary soundclash between Jammy’s own sound system and Black Scorpio at Waltham Park Road on February 23, 1985.

Stalag 17 Playlist

1 Frankie Paul – Don’t Worry Yourself – Volcano
2 General Echo – Arlene – Techniques
3 Admiral Tibett – Trouble To A Man – Techniques
4 Little Kirk – Whats Love Got To Do – Techniques
5 Yami Bolo – Take It Easy – Techniques
6 Cocoa Tea – We Do The Killing – Digital B
7 Super Beagle – Soundboy Dust Out – Techniques
8 Tenor Saw and Buju Banton – Ring The Alarm Quick – Techniques
9 Sister Nancy – Bam Bam – Techniques
10 Cutty Ranks – Rude Bwoy Game – Techniques
11 Nicodemus – Suzy Wong – Skengdon

Sleng Teng Playlist

1 Wayne Smith – Under Me Sleng Teng – Jammys
2 Tenor Saw – Pumpkin Belly – Jammys
3 Echo Minott – Original Fat Ting – Jammys
4 Buddy Bye – Johnny Osbourne – Jammys
5 Josey Wales – Cowboy Style – Jammys
6 Yelloman – Reggae Ambassador – Jammys
7 Tony Curtis – Weak – John John
8 Anthony Red Rose – Under Me Fat Ting – King Tubbys
9 John Wayne – Call The Police For Me – Jammys
10 Super Cat – Trash and Ready – Jammys
11 Frankie Paul – Cassandra – Steely and Clevie

Super Cat’s Career Highlighted in new mix

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 Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 22 – Super Cat takes Center Stage

Super Cat is a deejay who achieved widespread popularity during the late 1980s and early 1990s dancehall movement. His nickname,

Super Cat, Don Dada album artwork.

Super Cat is a deejay who achieved widespread popularity during the late 1980s and early 1990s dancehall movement. His nickname, “Wild Apache”, was given to him by his mentor Early B. He is the elder brother of reggae artist Junior Cat and is considered one of the greatest deejays within the Jamaican dance-hall scene to date.

This is not a commercial mix so if your’e listenting for the collaborations with Kriss Kross, Biggie Smalls, and 112 recorded after Cat was signed to Columbia Records, you are in the wrong place.

This mix goes back to the roots in the Cockburn Pen / Seaview Gardens section of Kingston, captures the style Super Cat brought live on stage performing with KillamanJaro Sound System, and tours through recordings produced by Steely & Clevie, King Jammy‘s, and his own Wild Apache Productions label.

About an hour in length, here is the #ReggaeLover tribute to Super Cat, a major figure in the positive-consciousness dancehall movement.

 

Sanchez, L.U.S.T, and Friends – Reggae Lover #4

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This installment of the Reggae Lover podcast is comprised of mostly lovers rock vibes with the likes of SanchezThriller U and Singing Melody, among others featured.

The selection here remains almost exclusively inside of the 1980’s era so you will hear covers of R&B hits from that period in abundance.

These tracks all share a very danceable tempo and are meant to keep you rocking, swinging, skanking, and bouncing throughout.  Please download and share!

Thank you for listening!  Requests? Feedback? Email ReggaeLoverPodcast@gmail.com to interact directly with me and also leave a comment below.

sanchez

Jamaican reggae singer, Sanchez

TRACKLIST

1   Sanchez – Love Me Forever
2   Beenie Man – Show Fi Flop
3   Sanchez – Lonely
4   Thriller U  – Just Once
5   Admiral Tibett – Destroy A Sound
6   Wayne Wonder – Ebony Eyes
7   Thriller U – Ribbon In The Sky
8   Singing Melody – In This Love Together
9   Super Cat and Chuck Turner – Dolly My Baby
10  Pinchers – Request To Denise
11  Sanchez – Joy
12  Singing Melody – Groovy Kind Of Love
13  Frankie Paul – I Wanna Rock
14  Alton Black and Blacka Ranks – A Gal A Watch You
15  Admiral Bailey – Girl Your Body Good
16  Shabba Ranks – Wicked Inna Bed
17  Shevell Francis – Dreaming
18  Trevor B – Tears On My Pillow
19  Pad Anthony – Slow Dancing
20  Clement Irie and Robert French – Bun and Cheese
21  Copper Ranking, Sixy Morris, Mark Wonder & Johnny Lee – Friends
22  Johnny P and Pliers – Money Bribe

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Reggae Artist Matik Keeps It Burning

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Reggae Artist Matik

Reggae Artist Matik

Jamaican-born, Los Angeles-based fusion reggae artist Matik is featured on Yahoo for his ineffable stance against the war on medical marijuana, which is addressed in his new single and video, “Keep It Burning.” Born Matthew Seow in Kingston and raised in Ocho Rios, Jamaica, Matik returns to his roots for this musical journey with a message.

“The mission is to really connect with the people,” reveals Matik. “I’m always trying to innovate and build on the foundation that all the greats before me have set.” Matik embarked on his mission over 5 years ago, with the ultimate goal of causing a revolution through music. His attention has been drawn to the plight of patients who depend on medical marijuana to ease their pain and suffering, and the legal battle to halt the distribution of medical marijuana to those who are in dire need. His message propelled his name across media, including cyber giant Yahoo, which recently shared his fight and message with their global audience. (Read Yahoo feature here.)

Matik is signed to Rootstar Entertainment, and has teamed up with some stellar names in reggae and dancehall music over the years, including producers Tony “CD” Kelly and Dwayne “Supa Dups” Chin-Quee of Black Chiney. He has also collaborated with the likes of dancehall star Ce’Cile and Latin rapper Don Dinero. Matik’s unique style is greatly influenced by a diverse array of artists, including Shabba Ranks, Super Cat, Peter Tosh, Bob Marley, Frank Sinatra, Bounty Killer and Buju Banton, just to name a few.

“Keep It Burning” is now available digitally worldwide, on the Sunset Blvd Riddim compilation album, released on November 2, 2012 from Typhoon Music Group. It has been embraced by reggae radio, both in the U.S. and Jamaica, receiving airplay on Jamaica’s top radio stations including IRIE FM, Hitz92 FM, ZIP FM, and HOT97BOSTON in the US.

The “Keep It Burning” video was directed by Jonathan Chia and portrays various lifestyles of medical marijuana users, from the elderly to businessmen. The video was shot at a dispensary in Los Angeles, just days before getting shut down. It debuted in late November on YouTube, and has amassed an astounding 25,000 views in less than a month, keeping this budding entertainer a burning topic for his growing audience, worldwide.

Matik will be releasing more singles, with an EP currently in production for early 2013. For more information on Matik, log on to matikmusic.com, and like him at Facebook.com/OriginalMatik or follow at Twitter.com/theMatik, YouTube.com/theRealMatik or Instagram.com/Matik_Music. For all inquiries, contact Rootstar Entertainment at Rootstar.Ent@gmail.com.

Heavy D Releases Hit Reggae Album

Legendary Hip Hop Artist Embraced By Old Fans And New; Scores #2 iTunes Reggae Album Chart Spot

Legendary Heavy D, (Dwight Myers) has found himself with one of the country’s hottest new reggae albums, Vibes. Hev’s new album currently owns the #2 spot on the iTunes Reggae chart.

Propelled by the top-requested single and digital favorite, Long Distance Girlfriend, the album has become a mainstay of Reggae playlists after only a month of release. Currently, the new album is available in digital-only format. The physical album will be released on December 16th across the U.S.

The versatile Heavy D is known as one of hip hop’s most palatable and gregarious rap artists. On Vibes he has reignited his reggae pedigree on his latest and long awaited offering. Born in Jamaica, his family moved to Mount Vernon, NY when he was 8, but the charismatic artist has always seasoned his music with a peppering of reggae influences. Keeping busy the past decade with an array of production chores and an impressive acting resume, he was determined to clear the deck long enough to hit the studio and create music that would combine his noted production heft with the influential reggae rhythms he grew up loving. “Reggae’s the first music I ever experienced,” says Hev.

“I’ve always mixed reggae and hip hop. But I came to a point where I felt I had put the exclamation mark on my hip hop career. I’m fortunate that I’ve been able to transfer the love, respect and passion I have for hip hop and reggae into my latest musical endeavor.”

Hev took great pains to imbue the album with an up-to-the-minute currency, but also anchors it with the kind of riveting authenticity that he has experience in his past collaborations with reggae giants such as
Super Cat, Buju Banton, Josey Wales and others.

“You can’t fake this stuff,” says Hev. “I learned a long time ago you go with the music that’s in your heart or you don’t go at all.”

Long Distance Girlfriend is the kind of nimble, horn-filled sonnet that grabs both avid reggae aficionados and mainstream music fans. Flexing his trademark repertoire of danceable rhythms, including the occasional ‘Hev-mastered’ signature hip hop beat (and even ska influences), songs such as Love You Like This, featuring Barrington Levy, and the soaring Queen Majesty, round out the hit album, with Hev’s relaxed, confident manner shining through on every track.

Also proud of the role he’s played for several years now as a self proclaimed ‘stay-at-home-dad,’ Hev cites the full spectrum of experiences that have shaped his life as motivation for Vibes.

“I’ve been blessed with family and work,” he says. “I’m an artist by birth. When I reached for inspiration to make sure this album flowed with the kind of organic spirit I felt for this music – it was there. You can’t ask for any more than that.”

Source: http://music.dubandreggae.com