Crucial Selections from The ‘A Love I Can Feel’ Rhythm

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AloveIcanfeelThis is another listener suggested mix specially prepared for the reggae lover podcast.

The ‘A Love I Can Feel‘ rhythm was first released on a vocal by John Holt under the same name in 1970. It was produced by Coxsone Dodd at Studio One and was a sizeable hit. John Holt re-recorded his original vocal a number of times (about once per decade) including for Henry ‘Junjo’ Lawes’ Volcano label, King Jammy, and the Parish label. The rhythm has been used around 100 times, most frequently by King Jammy and Donovon Germain of Penthouse Records.

Please download using the link below, and feel free to spread the word to fellow reggae lovers. Also email reggaeloverpodcast@gmail.com to make suggestions, requests or comments, and to get additional information.

Playlist:

1 John Holt – A Love I Can Feel – Studio One
2 Dennis Alcapone – A Love I Can Feel – Studio One
3 Freddie McGregor – When I’m Ready – Studio One
4 George Scott – Love You Still – Studio One
5 Cornell Campbell – Give Your Love To Me – Gorgon
6 Prince Jazzbo – Straight To I-Roy Head – Lagoon
7 Shinehead – Golden Touch – African Love
8 Josey Wales – Weh Dem A Go Do “86″ – Tuff Gong
9 Nana McClean – Nana’s Medley – Penthouse
10 Sanchez – Wont Last A Day – Germain
11 Tony Tuff – I’ve Got To Get You – Penthouse
12 Richie Stephens – Trying To Get To You – Penthouse
13 Tony Rebel – Fresh Vegetable – Penthouse
14 Pinchers – Stand By Me Pt. 2 – Penthouse
15 Sanchez – I Can’t Wait – Digital B
16 Beres Hammond – Tempted To Touch
17 Beres Hammond and Cutty Ranks – Love Me Haffi Get
18 Pinchers – Dreams and Illusions – Jammys
19 Frankie Paul – Benefit of the Doubt – Black Scorpio

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1990s Roots Reggae: Garnet Silk, Luciano, Anthony B #BlackLivesMatter

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rl-34_lalabella

Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 34 opens with Queen Ifrica, Anthony B, and Bushman singing about police brutality from a Jamaican perspective.

Riddims featured include Tempo, Shank I Sheck, Rockfort Rock, Promised Land, and Darker Shade of Black plus 1996’s masterpiece from Flames Productions, the Lalabella among others, while the subject-matter is conscious, spiritual and cultural.

The finale is “Splashing Dashing” (the 23rd Psalm) being performed by Garnett Silk on the Champion of the Arena riddim, released on the Fattis Burrell’s Exterminator record label. Rest In Peace to Garnett Silk who flew away home to Zion almost exactly 20 years ago.

Playlist:
1 Queen Ifrica – Babylon Blunder
2 Anthony B – Good Cop
3 Anthony B – Police
4 Anthony B – Fire Bun Now
5 Bushman – Robbery
6 Aaron Silk – The Right Path
7 Uton Green – No Looking Back
8 Lebanculah and Sugar Black – Oh Jah
9 Everton Blender – Ghetto People Song
10 Tony Rebel – Why Be Afraid
11 Bounty Killer and Junior Reid – This World Too Haunted
12 Glen Washington – Why
13 Garnett Silk and Capleton – Complaint
14 Luciano – One Way Ticket
15 Luciano – Raggamuffin
16 Everton Blender – Blow Your Nose
17 Beres Hammond – Freedom
18 Garnett Silk – Splashing Dashing

The Top Conscious Reggae Collaborations of the 1990’s

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This mix consists strictly of my favorite type of song, the collabo aka combination (duet, trio, etc.).  There is usually more energy to a song whenever two or more artists decide to join forces on a single musical project and in reggae music, the excitement is heightened when singers team up with deejays.

Reggae Lover Episode 1 - 1990s Combinations

Reggae Lover Podcast Episode 1 – 1990s Combinations

The combinations selected here are all reality (culture) tunes from the 1990s decade and a listen will most likely improve your mood.  Yes, this compilation will appeal to the #ReggaeLover, fight depression, and promote virtuous ways.

The track list is below. Requests? Email ReggaeLoverPodcast@gmail.com to interact directly with me and also leave a comment below.

Reggae Lover Episode 1 Playlist

1 Beenie Man and Luciano – Crazy Baldheads
2 Beenie Man and Barrington Levy – Murder (Remix)
3 Shabba Rank and Cocoa Tea – Flag Flown High
4 Beenie Man and Determine – Kette Drum
5 Capleton and Yami Bolo – Put Down The Weapon
6 Beenie Man and Barrington Levy – Under Me Sensi (Remix)
7 Beres Hammond and Buju Banton – Ain’t It Good To Know
8 Luciano and Sizzla – Jah Blessing
9 Luciano, Josey Wales and Charlie Chaplin – Rebel With A Cause
10 Garnet Silk and Tony Rebel – A Man Is A Man
11 Buju Banton and Tony Rebel – A So
12 Buju Banton and Toots – 54 46
13 Sugar Black and Lebenculah – Oh Jah
14 Carlton Livingston and Shabba Ranks – Don’t Follow Rumors
15 Chevell Franklin and Lady G – Thank You
16 Luciano, Terror Fabulous, Louie culture – We’re All In This Thing Together
17 Sizzla and Jah Cure – King In This Jungle
18 Garnet Silk and Richie Stephens – Fight Back

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Free Download: Penthouse Records Tribute Mix #reggae #podcast

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The man behind Donovan Germain with Romain Virgo.

The man behind Penthouse Records, Donovan Germain with reggae singer Romain Virgo. Photo Credit: unitedreggae.com

100% music from Penthouse Records can be heard in this mix-show podcast as heard live on the syndicated ‘Da Music Vault with Kahlil Wonda‘ radio broadcast (Daflavaradio.com Wednesdays 6-9pm EST)

Buju Banton - Mr Mention album cover for Buju's 1992 debut album.

Buju Banton – Mr Mention album cover for Buju’s 1992 debut album.

Download link.  Enjoy the Penthouse Records Mix cloudcast on Mixcloud.

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The 1st Lady of Reggae, Album in Stores – Marcia Griffiths And Friends

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The first lady of reggae is Marcia Griffiths. No other female vocalist has charted hits in as wide a range of styles in the genre. She is a one of a kind performer with a truly unique history in the music. In tribute to this great lady, Penthouse productions presents the two CD collection "Marcia and Friends" with 38 duets recorded in collaboration with the label. The collection features some of reggae's top vocalists in combination with the legendary singer.

Marcia Griffiths – Marcia Griffiths And Friends – Artwork

The first lady of reggae is Marcia Griffiths. No other female vocalist has charted hits in as wide a range of styles in the genre.  She is a one of a kind performer with a truly unique history in the music.  In tribute to this great lady, Penthouse productions presents the two CD collection “Marcia and Friends” with 38 duets recorded in collaboration with the label.  The collection features some of reggae’s top vocalists in combination with the legendary singer.

 

Jamaica’s Top Artists Set To Perform – Live On The Waterfront 2011

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“Live On The Waterfront” is a 4 day event brought to you by The Live Entertainment Group to Stimulate and revamp your taste for our Jamaican music on April 22 – 25 2011 . This phenomenal event will feature a few genres of our Jamaican musical culture like, Roots Rocking Reggae, Dancehall and Gospel etc.

Live On The Waterfront is geared towards bring back to Jamaica’s event calendar a truly authentic musical showcase, with a focus on the local talent rather than foreign acts. The Representation of Jamaican music will be from originators and innovators in the industry current and Old stars.

Acts such as Vintage line up; Charlie Chaplin, Josey Wales, U Roy and many more, Roots Rocking Reggae; Tarrus Riley, Tony Rebel, Etana and many more, Dancehall; Bounty Killa, I-Octane, Lady Saw and many more, Gospel; Carlene Davis, Dj Nicholas, Prodigal Son and many more. There will be various bands providing melodious rhymes that will soothe your ear and better yet Byron Lee’s Dragonairs will be there to electrify you with their wide collection of high energy soca music.

Pier One Montego Bay Jamaica will be the place where this new phenomenon will be born and staged. This venue as you know is the home for some of Jamaica’s/Montego Bay’s most luxurious sunset viewing with a wide view of the night sky as it touches the ocean and to top it off Pier One is also Montego Bay’s number 1 dining location. Pier One is also the home for some of Montego’s Bay biggest events like Short Circuit, Dancehall Queen, Fame Road Show and many more hit events.

Come meet, greet, eat and party responsibly in a safe and relaxing environment among friends, family and to sum it up great people.  Come and experience entertainment in a way you have never experienced before.

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Reggae Vault Classics Episode 8 – The Valentine’s Day Edition

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Englishman album cover
Image via Wikipedia

This week’s episode of the Reggae Vault Classics podcast is a freestyle mix consisting mostly of lover’s rock classics from the 80s and early 90s.  Tony Curtis starts things off with a cover of “For Your Love” on the Gunman rhythm before 3 songs in row from one of Jamaica’s favorite singers, Sanchez.  More Sanchez along with classic lovers hits from the likes of Brian and Tony Gold, Wayne Wonder, Skatta, Beres Hammond, Richie Stephens, Tony Tuff and Tony Rebel follow.  Bounty Killer, Shelly Thunder, and Tiger provide some dancehall D.J. stylee with tunes on the Kuff riddim and Leroy Gibbons’ mega hit “This Magic Moment” closes it out.  The grand finale for this mix show is performed by Barrington Levy, Dennis Brown, and Gregory Issacs.

Episode 8 flows really well so don’t be surprised if you have it on repeat once downloaded.  Thanks for listening! We will be back next week with another varied group of top rated selections out of the old reggae Vault.

Right Click the file and select “Save As…” to download the entire mp3 file or just click to listen to the audio stream now.  We sincerely hope you enjoy the selections and mixing.  Please send your comments, feedback, and requests to podcast@highlanda.net or feel free to comment at Highlanda.net.  If you like what you hear please subscribe to get automatic updates when new shows are added.

Reggae Vault Classics 8

1  For Your Love – Tony Curtis
2  Feels So ood – Sanchez
3  I’ll Give Anything – Sanchez
4  Lonliness – Sanchez
5  Sex Me – Brian and Tony Gold
6  Always In My Heart – Skatta
7  Nana’s Medley – Nana McClean
8  Trying To Get To You – Richie Stephens
9  First Time I Met You – Tony Tuff
10 Won’t Last A Day – Sanchez
11 Tempted To Touch – Beres Hammond / Cutty Ranks
12 I Can’t Wait – Sanchez
13 Sorry – Wayne Wonder
14 Cellular Number – Bounty Killer
15 Kuff – Shelly Thunder
16 Bam Bam – Tiger
17 This Magic Moment – Leroy Gibbons
18 Black Roses – Barrington Levy
19 Here I Come – Barrington Levy
20 Revolution – Dennis Brown
21 Rumors – Gregory Issacs

Media files:
Reggae_Vault_Classics_8.mp3 (MP3 Format Sound, 160 MB)

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Reggae Vault Classics Podcast Series – Episode 2

Highlanda Sound has put together something for the fans of that “Finest Years” era of dancehall. Reggae Vault Classics is here to represent the foundation of the music.

Listen to an episode and you will hear right away that Reggae Vault Classics features only classics mixed and blended so you can turn up your speakers or headphones and get lost in Kahlil Wonda’s mixes.

RVC Episode 2 starts off with Dennis Brown singing ‘Stop the Fussing and Fighting’ on the Real Rock riddim.  The mix also includes tunes on some of the biggest riddems ever such as Stalag, Far East, Swing Easy, and The General.

English: Reggae Singer Dennis Brown in Paris, ...

English: Reggae Singer Dennis Brown in Paris, France Français : Le chanteur de Reggae Dennis Brown à Paris (Palace) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Expect to hear artists and selections you don’t hear everyday, or maybe even every year for that matter.  The selection order and mixing are masterful, which makes it easy for anyone to enjoy, whether you are a dancehall novice or a foundation reggae enthusiast.

Click here to Listen: Reggae Vault Classics Episode 2.

1   Stop the Fussing and Fighting – Dennis Brown
2   Drop It Cool – Terror Fabulous
3   Putting Up ResistanceBeres Hammond
4   He Is My Friend – Luciano
5   Know Jah – Tony Rebel
6   Ganja Song – Spragga Benz/Baby Cham
7   Sensimelia Persecution – Buju Banton
8   Every Knee Shall Bow – Garnett Silk/Cocoa Tea/Charlie Chaplin
9   True Love – White Mice
10  Send Them Come – Terry Ganzie
11  Murderer – Buju Banton
12  Cold Blooded Murderer – Capleton
13  Nuh Have No Heart – Bounty Killer
14  Blood Stain – Pinchers
15  Reality – Shabba Ranks
16  Tune In – Cocoa Tea
17  Here I Am – Sanchez
18  Are You Still In Love With Me – Sanchez
19  Dances Are Changing – Barrington Levy
20  Ever Changing Times – Alton Black
21  Goodie Goodie – Colin Roach/Galaxy P
22  Kill A Sound – Quench Aid

 

Luciano rushed off stage in Atlanta

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Review of Spiritual Fyah with Luciano, Queen Ifrica, and Tony Rebel, 11/8/08 at Club Intrigue in Stone Mountain, GA.

 

The Setting

 

First off let me say for the record that since the mid 1990’s, when asked which artist puts on the best live stage show performance, my answer was and is Luciano.  I found out that he was going to be performing in Atlanta through word of mouth the day before the concert and decided to go since it had been a while since I attended a stage show.  Knowing that Caribbean events in Stone Mountain typically start late, I was in no rush to arrive.  I got inside Club Intrigue at around 2am after paying $30.  I had no problem forking up the money, because after all, it was for Luciano – my favorite live performer.  At that time there was a short line outside and the venue, which can hold approximately 1000 people was about half full.  More people continued to arrive over the next couple hours but the club wasn’t packed at all.

 

English: Photo of Tony Rebel, Jamaican reggae ...

English: Photo of Tony Rebel, Jamaican reggae legend (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

The Early Warm (part 1)

 

Local sound man, Danger Marcus finished up his set on the turntables and turned the controls over to Adonai Sound from Jamaica.  Dred from Adonai selected and mixed, while Atlanta’s Mix Master David acted as MC.  Adonai’s Dred started out with some foundation music, but then brought it to more recent conscious and lover’s rock reggae before starting to juggle with songs like ‘Living Dangerously‘ by Bounty Killer featuring Barrington Levy.  The music was decent though I would have liked to hear more culture played since it was a culture show.  Also, Mix Master David’s specialty is mixing, hence his name, and he struggled to connect with the audience while talking over music being played by the Adonai.  I don’t recall any forwards (big crowd responses) being achieved.

 

The Early Warm (part 2)

 

At around 3am, the stage show began with opening acts performing dirty south style hip-hop.  The first 4 acts took the stage rapping about various subject matter unrelated to the theme of the night (Spiritual Fyah), performing at least 2-3 songs each which made me think to myself, among other questions, “are the promoters familiar with the music of Luciano at all?”  After that the MC introduced Fire Harp, the first reggae artist, followed by Ras Idon, Ishmael Turner, and a female duet that reminded me of the group Floetry called Last Lyricists.  These performances were good and much more appropriate, but I think this whole portion of the show was too long.  Standing up and watching 8 artists you have never heard of sing songs you never heard before for over an hour doesn’t exactly energize a crowd, especially at that time of morning.

 

More Earlies

 

The MC then announced that the DJ would take over for a while until the remaining artists were ready to take the stage so Nolan from King Eternity began to select and was joined by Danger Marcus as MC.  I think Danger Marcus was better than Mix Master David as he ventured away from the DJ booth in the corner of the stage out to front stage a few times to interact with the crowd.  He had more energy, but It didn’t transfer over to the audience.  This whole time, the majority of the people were at the back of the club, near the bar or in the far corners so it was pretty empty in front of the stage and on the main dance-floor.  During his set, Nolan selected 2002 – 2003 tunes and juggled on riddims like Diwali, Buyout and the Buzz at 4 o’clock in the morning.  The selection was not fitting with the theme of the night in general and this prevented the vibes from reaching anywhere.  I still can’t believe that I heard no Beres Hammond, Garnett Silk, Capleton, conscious Sizzla… No Anthony B, Everton Blender, Chuck Fender, Bob Marley or any other Marley…  You get my drift.

 

Showtime

 

It is at this point that the event started suffering from attrition and people began to trickle out one by one.  I am sure patrons wondered if the artists they had paid to see were even in Atlanta at all, I know I did.  Eventually the MC came back on stage to resume the stage show after the long break and brought out Anthony Malvo.  There was still no band in sight, but at least there was a known reggae artist.  Anthony Malvo was able to entertain the crowd singing covers of different reggae hits mostly, and his biggest response was in tribute to the late great Alton Ellis.

 

It was great to see band members emerge and take there place along with Delly who travelled from Jamaica to be the official MC/host.  It was around 5am now, and whoever had stuck around that long had to be glad to know that Luciano would be coming out soon.  Delly then introduced Papa Michi, Michigan from the foundation DJ duo Michigan and Smiley.  I was shocked just to see this artist still performing at his age, but he went through some covers, another Alton Ellis tribute with the same songs Anthony Malvo sang, and also performed the 1980 hit, Diseases.  Not bad at all, I just wished it was at least 3 hours earlier.

 

 

Star time

 

Queen Ifrica touched the stage and pulled stragglers in from the far corners of Club Intrigue to the front of the stage.  She was well received and sang all her hits from the past 2 years, stopping only to give relevant speeches and introduce her songs like a pro.  She worked well with the band and stayed on stage for approximately 30 minutes, ending off with her current hit tune, ‘Keep it to Yourself.’  Her performance was short and sweet.

 

Tony Rebel was up next.  Rebel Tony showed poise and veteranship while on stage.  He immediatley commanced attention from the crowd and went through the hits that he is know for globally, including Fresh Vegetable, Chatty Chatty, and If Jah.  He also gave some lyrics about the rise of President Barack Obama to bring it current.  Tony Rebel’s segment was longer than Queen Ifrica’s – I’d say about 45 minutes, which meant that now it was 6:30am.

 

Luciano took the stage to close the show and was well worth the wait.  I will continue to support this artist because of the vibes and energy he puts into his shows.  He skanked, jumped, and tumbled across the stage.  He prayed for Barack Obama and gave good reports from his trip to Kenya, which was during the time of the recent Presidential election in the US.  Luci did hits from different albums, but while singing Glory Be, given the signal that he had to leave to catch his plane.  His performance ended up being not much longer than some of the opening acts which is sad, however in the short time he was on stage (at almost 7am) he was still able to completely energize the audience and get everyone back onto their feet and in a vibes.  Then he stopped the last song and had the band start over, playing low so he could at least finish properly, kneeling down to say a prayer in the process.  The Messenger Luciano shook the hands of all who were near enough to the stage and posed for pictures as if truly grateful for the opportunity to carry out his life mission – to spread Jah love and a conscious message through singing.

 

Please share your comments on these artists, concerts or events you have been to, etc.  I will be breaking down the Atlanta dancehall scene in depth in future posts so you will want to stay tuned, trust me.  That’s all for now.