Diseases Riddim Hits Mix | Reggae Lover Episode 66

diseases riddim reggae lover artwork

Diseases Riddim Mix | Reggae Lover by Highlanda Sound | Episode 66

The Diseases riddim, which is sometimes referred to or known as the Golden Hen riddim is featured here.

I call it the Worries in the Dance Riddim, but the original version of the instrumental was used for the song entitled “Mad Mad Mad” produced in the 1960s by Coxsone Dodd for his Studio One label featuring Alton Ellis on the main vocals. Therefore the original name of this riddim is Mad Mad Mad.

This mix starts with Mad Mad Mad by Alton Ellis and goes all the way to Sizzla in the end. Thank you for listening to the #ReggaeLoverPodcast

PLAYLIST:

  1. Alton Ellis – Mad Mad Mad
  2. Louie Lepke – Jamaica On My Mind
  3. Stevie Face – Can’t Go Round It
  4. Dennis Brown – Coming Home Tonight
  5. Don Carlos – I’m Not Crazy
  6. Linval ThompsonLook How Me Sexy
  7. Frankie Paul – Sindie
  8. Frankie Paul – Worries In The Dance
  9. Sister Nancy – Ain’t no Stopping Nancy Now
  10. Anthony B – Fire Bun Now
  11. Yellowman – I’m Getting Married
  12. Yellowman – I’m Getting Divorced
  13. Toyan – Barry G
  14. Sister Nancy – Coward of the Country
  15. Michael Palmer – Lick Shot
  16. Half Pint – Soul Mate
  17. Tenor Saw – Golden Hen
  18. Shinehead – Rough and Rugged
  19. Cocoa Tea – I’ve Lost My Sonia
  20. Michigan and Smiley – Diseases
  21. Josey Wales – Leggo Me Hand Gateman
  22. Iba Mahr – Set Away
  23. Bugle – Same Game
  24. Sizzla – Sekkle Dung

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The Taxi Riddim featured in exclusive Dancehall foundation mix

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The TAXI riddim has been around for a long time, and it will never leave the dancehall. This riddim is foundation!!

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I kicked off this special mix with the Sister Nancy hit entitled One Two which was released around 1976 by producer Winston Riley on the Techniques label. There are a few earlier versions of Taxi, but once Sly and Robbie cut their version, the riddim really took off.  You will hear 30 tracks in the mix, ranging from the 1980s to 2009.

This unique mix was suggested by a subscriber.  How does this compare to other Taxi riddim mixes you have heard?  Use #ReggaeLover across all social media when sharing the links or giving feedback, or email directly to ReggaeLoverPodcast@Gmail.com.

Tracklist:

1 Sister Nancy – One Two
2 Yelloman and Fathead – Bam Bam
3 Sister Nancy and Yellowman – Bloodstain
4 Sanchez – Some Guys
5 Wayne Wonder – Anything For You
6 Scotty – Shining Star
7 Wayne Wonder – Fast Car
8 Foxy Brown – Baby Can I Hold You Tonight
9 Junie Ranks – Lick Out
10 Tiger – Ram Dancehall
11 Tony Rebel – New DJ Is Coming
12 Bounty Killer – The Lord Is My Salvation
13 Freddie MvGregor – Prophecy
14 Hammermouth – The Great
15 General Threes – Road Code
16 Johnny Osborne – Reasons
17 Junior Reid – Bubblers
18 Little John – True Confessions
19 Burro Banton – Dem A Gangster
20 Andrew Bell – Escape The Beating (Dubplate)
21 Rude Boyz International – Champion (Dubplate)
22 Mikey Melody – Mellow (Dubplate)
23 Capleton and Uplifter – Africa Bound
24 Sadiki – Lost Without You
25 Michelle Gordon – Exhale Shoop Shoop
26 Ambelique – Taxi
27 Bitty McClean – Lately (Jamaican Mix)
28 Mr. Vegas – Gangsta Law (Radio)
29 Buju Banton – Driver
30 Elephant Man – Bring It

Yellowman: Young, Gifted & Yellow

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Young, Gifted & Yellow is a 2 CD / DVD Anthology of the legendary Yellowman the inimitable deejay whose style and originality broke Jamaican dancehall to international acclaim in the mid 1980s.

Yellowman - Young, Gifted & Yellow - Artwork

In stores now, the deluxe package includes:
– 40 re-mastered tracks including rare & classic favorites
– A full 25 minute concert performance DVD recorded at Reggae Sunsplash in 1988
– Sleeve notes written by Reggae historian Noel Hawkes

 

Reggae Vault Classics Features Henry “Junjo” Lawes & Hits From Volcano

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Reggae Vault Classics highlights legendary reggae music producer Henry “Junjo” Lawes and spins hit songs from his Volcano Record Label in this Featured Icon Segment by Highlanda Sound.

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Sponsored by The Honorary Citizen.

ACCESS PODCAST

Playlist

1  Kingdom Rise and Kingdom Fall – The Wailing Souls

2  Firehouse Rock (Waterhouse Rock) – The Wailing Souls

3  Give Another Israel A Try – Barry Brown

4  Ganja Dub – Scientist

5  Police In HelicopterJohn Holt

6  Bible Story – Early B

7  Sister Carol – Barrington Levy

8  Bubbling Telephone – Charlie Chaplin

9  Ice Cream Love – Johnny Osborne

10 Lost Mi Love – Yellowman

11 Miss Know It All – Scientist

12 Come Fe Mash It – Tony Tuff

13 Who Can Make The Dance Ram – Yellowman

14 21 Girls Salute – Barrington Levy

15 Rocking DollyCocoa Tea

16 I Am The Don – Leroy Smart

17 Mr. Chin – Yellowman

18 Bam Bam – Yellowman & Fathead

19 Virgin Girl (A Wha Do Dem) – Eek-A-Mouse

20 Prison Oval Rock – Barrington Levy

21 Hog and Goat – Don Carlos

22 Gunman – Michael Prophet

23 Stealing – John Holt

24 Nobody Move Noboby Get Hurt – Yellowman

25 Jam Dance Master – Yellowman

26 Pass The Kushungpeng – Frankie Paul

27 Worries In The Dance – Frankie Paul

28 Zunguzunguguzungguzeng – Frankie Paul

king yellowman

king yellowman (Photo credit: cultchas)

 

Kemar ‘Flava’ McGregor Releases “80s Rock Riddim” on iTunes

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Kemar ‘Flava’ McGregor premiered his new riddim album, “80s Rock Riddim,” Tuesday, January 8, 2013 on iTunes, representing the first of an upcoming series of 1980s-styled pop-reggae projects.

The riddim album – which features new tracks from Gappy Ranks, Gyptian, Aaron Silk and JC Lodge – combines musical motifs from Brit-pop, R&B, soul and 1980’s dancehall, to create a distinctive mixture of melodic pop with a propulsive one-drop bass groove.

Kemar 'Flava' McGregor Releases "80s Rock Riddim" on iTunes

Kemar ‘Flava’ McGregor Releases “80s Rock Riddim” on iTunes

In early 2012, McGregor departed from the reggae mainstream, and began producing pop-reggae tracks for the corporate licensing market, which enlists a higher percentage of uplifting 1980s-era tracks that remind listeners of reggae’s bygone golden era.

With “80s Rock Riddim,” McGregor wanted to repair a longstanding credibility problem within the modern reggae industry – an industry that erroneously insists on producing music with negative lyrics and depressing musical styles that reggae fans never wanted, and often at the expense of melodic, party reggae, which has always attracted more customers globally than the negative-themed music of the reggae mainstream.

The concept of ‘80s Rock’ is to try to bring people back to the good old days of vocal reggae,” said McGregor. “The 1980s was where reggae got its fame and popularity. There’s a joy that I get from listening to ‘80s music – it makes you feel like living is worthwhile. And it’s not just reggae, it’s a lot of the ‘80s music. There’s also some good R&B that makes you feel that way.”

McGregor said “80s Rock Riddim” was inspired in large part by the great riddims of the 1980s, including “Far East” (Barry Brown’s version from 1986), “Sleng Teng” (1985), and popular albums “Big Ship,” by Freddie McGregor (1982), and “Rub-A-Dub Style,” by Michigan & Smiley (1980).

From McGregor’s point of view, these styles established reggae music as a universal worldwide party idiom, which would guarantee celebratory vibes regardless of where the music was played.

Apparently, today’s reggae scene has lost this celebratory spirit, McGregor said.

When I used to watch videotapes from the 1980s, I would see all those people dancing – the couples were slow-wining so tight, that not even the breeze could get through them,” McGregor said. “Today, when I go to a party, the ladies will be standing on the left side of the room, and the men will be standing on the right. The men will be screwing their faces, and the women will be standing with their arms crossed. That’s not the way to party.”

When I look at a dance floor today, I’ll hear a bunch of noise coming from the speakers, and when I look at the dance floor, I’ll expect to see a man and a woman dancing, but instead I’ll see a group of men dancing in the middle of the floor by themselves. I don’t want to see that.”

To illustrate his love for 1980s music, McGregor recorded a mixture of melodic songs from the most active artists in the new reggae industry, including Aaron Silk, Junior Kelly, Gappy Ranks, Adele Harley and Ammoye, along with a cadre of vocal legends from the 2000-decade mixtape era, such as Norris Man, Gyptian, Jah Mali and Tony Anthony. In addition, “80s Rock Riddim” will contain songs from “America’s Got Talent” finalist Cas Haley, and British reggae luminaries JC Lodge, Carroll Thompson and Don Campbell.

McGregor’s ultimate goal is to send a message that reggae’s survival will require producers to satisfy the demands of real customers, instead of using drug money to promote negative-themed music that no one wants to buy. McGregor said sales statistics already indicate that consumers prefer the sound of the 1980s.

Overall, I would say the music of the 1980s was more uplifting. There was more joy into it,” McGregor said. “Most of what the artists were saying in their lyrics – whether it was lovers rock, roots or rub-a-dub – you were excited about what was taking place. The stuff they were singing about, like Yellowman and Michigan & Smiley, it would make you want go out and have a good time. That’s why I like the ‘80s music. It has a lot of value to it.”

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